Omega Centauri


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Omega Centauri

(sen-tor -ÿ, -ee) (ω Cen; NGC 5139) A huge impressive globular cluster, magnitude 3.7, diameter 0°.6, in the constellation Centaurus. At about 5212 parsecs distant, it is one of the closest globulars to the Solar System. The million or so stars of which it is composed show a surprising range of metal content and possibly age. It is an X-ray source.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
However, "despite the large number of stars concentrated in Omega Centauri's core, the prevalence of exoplanets remains somewhat unknown".
Paul and Liz Downing, from their observatory in southern Spain (latitude 36[degrees] 51' 42" N, longitude 3[degrees] 15m 30s W--see Journal 117(6), 2007), are able to observe both globulars--albeit with Omega Centauri considerably closer to the horizon--and their images, made at the same scale, are shown here.
"That this is indeed the case for Omega Centauri was demonstrated from observations by C.
<div class="caption">Colorful Stars Galore Inside Globular Star Cluster Omega Centauri NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped this panoramic view of a colorful assortment of 100,000 stars residing in the crowded core of a giant star cluster.
The globular star cluster Omega Centauri has caught the attention of sky watchers ever since the ancient astronomer Ptolemy first catalogued it 2,000 years ago.
She says that Omega Centauri may have collided at some earlier time with another cluster to create the mix of ultraviolet intensities and the lower-than-expected core density apparent in the globular cluster today.
Now, new observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini observatories have indicated that there is a medium sized black hole sitting at Omega Centauri's centre.
Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) hugs our horizon in May and can be seen as a very pale, very large, unresolved circular glow.
Incredible showpieces such as the Eta Carina Nebula, Omega Centauri, the Coal Sack, 47 Tucanae, and countless other objects that are hidden below the horizon back home, are in full view from Chile.
We chuckled when we read Fred Schaafs comment about observing Omega Centauri from latitude 41[degrees] north ("A Star by Any Other Name," June issue, page 40).
In commemoration, why not try to observe an object that Halley's Comet passed near in April 1986: the great globular cluster Omega Centauri? It had been cataloged as a star for more than a millennium before Edmond Halley first realized that it's actually a cluster.
Next month I'll discuss two other celestial objects with Halley connections--the far-south star Beta Carinae and not-so-far-south globular cluster Omega Centauri.