omega

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omega

the 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet (Ω, ω), a long vowel, transliterated as o or o
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

omega

(ω)
1. The 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet used in stellar nomenclature usually to designate the 24th-brightest star in a constellation or sometimes to indicate a star's position in a group. See also Omega Centauri.
2. Symbol for angular velocity.
3. Symbol for argument of perihelion (see orbital elements).
4. Another name for density parameter. See mean density of matter.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Omega

[ō′meg·ə]
(navigation)
A worldwide radio navigation system providing navigational parameters by phase comparison of very-low-frequency (10 to 14 kilohertz), continuous-wave radio signals; terminated on September 30, 1997.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

angular frequency (ω)

The frequency of a periodic quantity multiplied by 2p; expressed in radians.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

OMEGA

OMEGA
Lanes and lines of position generated in OMEGA.
An obsolete ground-based, long-range, radio navigational aid, in which aircraft position was derived from the phase measurement or phase comparison of VLF (very low frequency) signals in the 10 to 14 kHz band. Every ten seconds, each of eight stations located around the world radiated a unique pattern on four common frequencies (10.2, 11.05, 11.3, and 13.6 kHz) in time-sharing cycles with a silent 0.2-s interval between each transmission. Besides these common frequencies, each of the stations transmitted on a unique frequency. Any time an aircraft OMEGA receiver received three frequencies, the lines of position were fixed by the OMEGA navigational system computer. A highly automated aid, it provided highly accurate information about the wind velocity, time, distance, and course to the destination or waypoint; ETA (estimated time of arrival); and the present location of the aircraft.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Omega

(programming)
A prototype-based object-oriented language from Austria.

["Type-Safe Object-Oriented Programming with Prototypes - The Concept of Omega", G. Blaschek, Structured Programming 12:217-225, 1991].

Omega

(text, tool)
A successor to TeX extended to handle the Unicode character set.

http://ens.fr/omega/.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
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TABLE: ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS Essential Fatty Acids AE Alpha-Linolenic Acid Linoleic Acid (18:3n-3) (18:2n-6) Number of Carbons 18 18 Number of Double Bonds 3 2 Omega Designation Omega-3 Omega-6 Category Long Chain Long Chain Polyunsaturated Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Fatty Acid Significant Related EPA (20:5n-3) GLA (18:3n-6) Fatty Acids Eicosapentanoic Acid Gamma Linolenic Acid DHA (22:6n-3) CLA (18:2n-6) Docosahexanoic Acid Conjugated Linoleic Acid Dietary Sources Flaxseed Meat Rapeseed Peanuts Walnuts Corn Microalgae Soy Fatty Cold Water Farmed salmon Fish Relative Prevalence Low High in U.S.