omnivore

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omnivore:

see carnivorecarnivore
, term commonly applied to any animal whose diet consists wholly or largely of animal matter. In animal systematics it refers to members of the mammalian order Carnivora (see Chordata).
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omnivore

[′äm·nə‚vȯr]
(zoology)
An organism that eats both animal and vegetable matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Food chain length and omnivory determine the stability of a marine subtidal food web.
Variance in isotopic signatures as a descriptor of tissue turnover and degree of omnivory. Funct.
And the web complexity and omnivory also increased [11].
In North American deserts, granivory is the dominant dietary strategy among rodent species; while in Australian, South African and South American deserts the most common dietary strategies of small mammals are insectivory, omnivory and herbivory respectively (Mares & Rosenzweig, 1978; Kerley, 1992; Murray et al., 1999; Campos et al., 2001; Giannoni et al., 2005).
scripta due to differences in their levels of omnivory. Despite the presence of conspecifics and T.
The meat-centric view of early modern humans stems partly from the fact that meat-eating leaves a more indelible mark in the archaeological record than omnivory, says Laura Longo, an archaeologist at the University of Siena in Italy and an author on the paper.
rosenbergii is carnivorous during their first larval stages and thereafter is observed to become more inclined towards omnivory and the capture of food by the larvae is non selective but its ingestion has been documented as a selective process (Barros and Valenti, 1997).
Coll & Guershon (2002) identify "true omnivory" (i.e., feeding on both plants and prey) in spiders, citing members of two families in particular: an araneid that feeds on pollen grains in the juvenile stage, which the spiderlings trap and eat incidentally when they eat and recycle their webs (Smith & Mommsen 1984), and an anyphaenid that feeds on plant nectar (Taylor & Foster 1996).
Another network property of interest in ecology is omnivory (which does not mean eating lots of species but rather eating at multiple levels on the food chain, as when Species A eats Species B and also eats B's prey C).
Omnivory is certainly a dietary strategy that also needs to be addressed when studying peccaries because many extant suids are omnivorous.
Cascading effects of predatory diversity and omnivory in a marine food web.
'Food Webs' has ten main chapters - Food webs, Models and their local stability, Stability: other definitions, Food web complexity I: theoretical results, Food web complexity II: empirical results, The length of food chains, The patterns of omnivory, Compartments, Descriptive statistics, and Food web design: causes and consequences.