Omoo


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Omoo

Polynesian word for an island rover. [Am. Lit.: Omoo]
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Melville himself was all too aware that, in terms of intrigue and excitement, a writer's life often paled next to his works; thus, early books such as Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847) were his own experiences padded out with imaginative flights and material culled from other books.
Melville, por ejemplo, inicio su carrera en el filon del viaje y la aventura como Omoo y Typee" (Wolfe, 1973: 42).
Emi o ni gbagba aje otosi/Ti o maa laki sa jini jkaye/emi o le gbagba eye/Ti i figba ori omoo tiwon on mumi/ emi o le seye kannakanna erujeje [50]Eye afeje eniyan soro l'Awe/Tori boso ile ba pomo re/Oun o ni gbenu aye ra si/Aje to fase agba pomo ajeji / O pe ni, o ya ni / Oluwa re a rahun gbehin/Odo to ba seesi gbegi nibuu o /Ara rere ko ni ao fi lo/Ojo sigidi ba wemi lodo /Ni o tun rile aye mo [60]/Bi mo ba gbagba aje aye tan/Mo rohun ti n ba maafajee mi se o/Aje aremo, Aje ogbagba.
12) In the May 5, 1847, Brooklyn Daily Eagle review of Omoo, Whitman writes: "Omoo, the new work .
His star had fallen from the firmament of American authors after Typee (more than 16,320 copies sold in his lifetime, on both sides of the Atlantic) and Omoo (13,335 copies).
Particularly compelling is the reclamation of the unjustly neglected Omoo, which Hayes positions as an important and "very funny book" (33) in the Melville canon; in his discussion of the significance of the "flaneur" for the novel and in his careful distinction of the "beachcomber" and the "rover" (35), which clarifies distinctions between Typee and Omoo, Hayes opens up possibilities for further critical investigation.
Melville didn't have two Moby-Dicks, but I pity the reader who can't exult in "The Encantadas" or in Omoo.
43) In a review of Typee and Melville's second novel, Omoo, Horace Greeley wrote of Melville being "positively diseased in moral tone, and will be fairly condemned as dangerous reading for those of immature intellects and unsettled principles.
In contrast, Herman Melville's autobiographical novels Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846) and Omoo (1847) recognize that missionaries have improved morality, translated the Bible into the vernacular, and established churches and schools in the Marquesas, Sandwich, and Society Islands, but Melville laments their racial prejudice and insensitivity to local traditions, arguing that "they had exaggerated the evils of Paganism, in order to enhance the merit of their own disinterested labours.
Beginning with a chapter on biography, the book discusses Melville's contributions to American literature, his influence, genres, and major works: Typee, Omoo, Mardi, Redburn, White-Jacket, Moby-Dick, Pierre, The Confidence Man, and Billy Budd, in addition to his short fiction, serialized novels, and poetry.
There seems no reason not to take seriously Melville's assurance that he expected to have the new work ready in the latter part of the next autumn--which would, after all, put the completion after Thanksgiving and near Christmas, like Omoo [1847], making a total of ten or eleven months for composition of a single book by a man who had written two books in four months the year before.
Still a recent coinage, the word "beachcomber" in 1849 meant approximately what we mean by "beach bum": it evoked a character like the narrator of Melville's Omoo, a transient ne'er-do-well who'd fled from civilization hoping to sample tropical women and tropical fruits and loaf around beneath the blowsy palms.