oncomouse

(redirected from Onco-mouse)
Also found in: Dictionary.

oncomouse

[′äŋk·ə‚mau̇s]
(biology)
A laboratory mouse that carries activated human cancer genes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, the onco-mouse has been patented in numerous European countries and in the United States; in fact, there was no evidence before the Supreme Court that a patent on the oncomouse has been denied in any other jurisdiction in which it was sought.
The Division also considered the issues of "morality" and ordre public, applying the new balancing test advanced by the Board.(109) The Division considered the invention's usefulness as a cancer research tool and concluded that the invention's usefulness to mankind outweighed animal suffering and risks to the environment.(110) The Division decided that the Onco-mouse's "usefulness to mankind [could not] be denied.
The issues considered in Decision T 19/90 were applied to transgenic plants in February, 1995, when the recently established Technical Board for biotechnology matters (Bio-Technical Board) handed down the landmark Decision T 356/93.(112) Although Decision T 356/93 may be interpreted to not contradict Decision T 19/90, unfortunately overrules the Division's final decision regarding T 19/90, and may have dire consequences for the Harvard Onco-mouse patent.(113)
The most distressing effect of the Bio-Technical Board's new definition is its overruling of the Examining Division's decision following Decision T 19/90 declaring the Harvard Onco-mouse patentable.(164) The product claim in T 19/90 related to a transgenic non-human mammalian animal with a activated onco-gene integrated into its chromosomes.165 Applying the new logic of Decision T 356/93 to that situation, the Animal itself would now be unpatentable because, although the initial steps of introducing the foreign DNA into the mouse oocyte may possibly be considered a microbiological process, the subsequent steps involving mouse differentiation and reproduction would result in unpatentable products (mice) produced by essentially biological processes.