One Hundred Years of Solitude


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One Hundred Years of Solitude

encompasses the sweep of Latin American history. [Lat. Am. Lit.: Gabriel Garcia Marquez One Hundred Years of Solitude in Weiss, 336]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
From 'One Hundred Years of Solitude' (1967) to 'The Autumn of the Patriarch' (1975), Marquez wielded literature as a weapon to expose the toxic cocktail of untrammeled violence, hubris and dark dictatorships that haunted and ravaged much of Latin America for centuries.
That aside, my all-time favourite is One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez...
Critique: Occasionally illustrated with historic black-and-white photo images, "Solitude & Company" is enhanced with the inclusion of an informative prologue (One Hundred Years of Solitude), and a six page listing of Notes on the Most Important Voices'.
But, while some of his shorter books were adapted, his father was concerned that "One Hundred Years of Solitude" would not translate well or fit within a single movie (or even two), he added.
Since its release, 'One Hundred Years of Solitude' has sold an estimated 50 million copies worldwide and has been translated into 46 languages.
Along with each head was an ID card to identify the victim since some of the faces were completely disfigured, either by torture before the beheading or by something similar after the slaughter.' Enough to send a shiver down one's spine, it made me think of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and his One Hundred Years of Solitude. But Iraq is no Macondo.
This was notably done by Gabriel GarcE[degrees]a MEirquez in his seminal work, One Hundred Years of Solitude. When President Trump says that he has already started building the wall in the border with Mexico, he is bending reality.
The climax of One Hundred Years of Solitude is famously based on a true historical event that took place shortly after Garcia Marquez's birth in the Magdalena banana zone on Colombia's Caribbean coast.
For fans of: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende.
Along with the German Gunter Grass's novel The Tin Drum and the Colombian Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, Rushdie's novels - especially Midnight's Children - turned history into a protagonist, a live and slippery character in his massive novels.
Born in Aracataca, Colombia on March 6, 1927, Marquez was famous for books like "One Hundred Years of Solitude," "Love in the Time of Cholera" and "Chronicle of a Death Foretold." He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. 
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Struggle, and Violence Along the US/Mexico Border: An Oral History