Oneida

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Oneida:

see Iroquois ConfederacyIroquois Confederacy
or Iroquois League
, North American confederation of indigenous peoples, initially comprising the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca; the native name for the confederated peoples is the Haudenosaunee.
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.

Oneida

(ōnī`də), city (1990 pop. 10,850), Madison co., central N.Y.; inc. 1901. Tableware was long the best-known product, and some is still manufactured in neighboring Sherrill, N.Y. Machine parts and food and dairy processing are among Oneida's industries. Nearby was the Oneida Community, a religious society of Perfectionists that was established (1848) by John Humphrey NoyesNoyes, John Humphrey,
1811–86, American reformer, founder of the Oneida community, b. Brattleboro, Vt. He studied theology at Yale but lost his license to preach because of his "perfectionist" doctrine. This took its name from Mat. 5.
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, who formed his utopian community on the basis of what he called "Bible Communism." Members of the sect held all property in common, rejected patriarchal control, believed in equal rights for women, and practiced complex marriage (polyamory and free love) and common care of the children. The community prospered by making steel traps and tableware. Under external and internal pressures to change its practices, the social experiments were abandoned beginning in 1879 and by 1881 Oneida had been reorganized as a joint stock company. The community's large Mansion House survives as an apartment residence, museum, and guesthouse.

Bibliography

See C. N. Robertson, ed., Oneida Community (1981); E. Wayland-Smith, Oneida: From Free Love to the Well-Set Table (2016).

Oneida

founded by John Humphrey Noyes in New York; based on extended family system. [Am. Hist.: EB, X: 315]
See: Utopia

Oneida

1. Lake. a lake in central New York State: part of the New York State Barge Canal system. Length: about 35 km (22 miles). Greatest width: 9 km (6 miles)
2. a North American Indian people formerly living east of Lake Ontario; one of the Iroquois peoples
3. a member of this people
4. the language of this people, belonging to the Iroquoian family
References in periodicals archive ?
We feel that since the Oneidas belong to four different [religious] denominations, this property which is naturally a civic center for all the people, should not be turned over to any one sectarian interest.
The Committee also wishes to state that it has been much interested in learning of the plan of the proposed Lolomi Industrial Community for the Oneidas, and feels that if it can be successfully organized and executed, it would provide the Indians with a protection from exploitation which they very much need, and be a stimulus to the social and industrial development of the community.
An especially helpful component of this text is its introduction to the history and situation of the Oneida people.
Oneida Lives enlightens readers about the issues of marriage and courtship, education and boarding school, hunting and working, and spirituality.
Rather than let the non-Oneida and Oneida interpretations of Oneida history stand for themselves, the editors have assembled a few essays in conclusion that propose ways to reconcile the two approaches.
The Oneida Indian Journey is an important book because it corrects a problem raised by, among other recent works, Devon Mihesuah's edited collection, Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians (Lincoln, 1998).
The potential windfall notwithstanding, the Oneidas argue that the land claim is about more than maximizing returns on a legal loophole.
Nevertheless, the Sullivan County Casino Advisory Board group had once talked with the Oneidas, but now have an memorandum of understanding with the St.
For the most part, the Wisconsin Oneidas do not use the term diaspora, preferring instead to stress the idea of removal, which in itself is a term contextualized by U.S.
Editor Herbert Lewis says in his introduction that the Oneidas in Wisconsin in the early 1800s led lives very parallel to those of non-Indians.
The excerpts in Oneida Lives are from project interviews recorded in English.