Onondaga Lake


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Onondaga Lake

(ŏnəndä`gə, –dô`–), brackish lake, 5 mi (8 km) long and 1 mi (1.6 km) wide, central N.Y., NW of Syracuse. In 1654, Father LeMoyne, a missionary, was taken to salt springs along the lake shore by the Onondagas. He showed them how to obtain salt from the water by boiling it. In 1795 the lake was purchased from the Native Americans by New York state for its salt resources. The Salt Museum on the lakeshore near Liverpool contains relics of the early salt industry, which thrived in the mid-19th cent.
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"While progress has been made in cleaning up Onondaga Lake, there are still serious pollution problems.
For more information on “Beneath the Surface” check out the video trailer at http://ottomediaco.com/beneaththesurface or the project's Facebook page which can be found under Beneath the Surface The Storied History of Onondaga Lake. To make a tax deductible donation to the Onondaga Historical Association to support this project please contact Lynne Pascale at (315) 428-1864 ex.
However, because the waste beds have yet to be closed to current environmental standards, the chlorides have affected the surrounding groundwater and surface water, including Nine Mile Creek (which drains to Onondaga Lake), "necessitating a modern closure plan," the department said.
Initially, laboratory studies used sediments from Onondaga Lake, which is a freshwater superfund site in Syracuse, New York; Pile's Creek, a polluted tributary of the Arthur Kill; and Blue Mountain Lake, a nearly pristine lake in the Adirondack Mountains of New York.
The Metropolitan plant is located adjacent to Onondaga Lake, and the length of pilings required to reach bedrock dictated that the new facilities be as small in size as possible, explained USFilter's Terry Mah.
The regional administrator for the EPA said that Onondaga Lake is getting cleaner, but still has "a very long way to go."
I've often wondered what the Great White Pine tree must have looked like along the shores of Onondaga Lake more than a thousand years ago.
Aside from the annual Wisdom Keeper awarding ceremony, the organization has other projects that include Citizens Academy, an open forum on “Civil Discourse,” and Re-imagining Onondaga Lake.
The EPA has finalized its plan to clean up contaminated soil and sediment at the Lower Ley Creek area of the Onondaga Lake Superfund Site located in the City of Syracuse and Town of Salina, Onondaga County, New York.
Honeywell International is scheduled to begin dredging contaminated sediment from the bottom of Onondaga Lake this summer.