Oomycetes

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Related to Oomycete: water mold, Oomycota

Oomycetes

A class of fungi in the subdivision Mastigomycotina. They comprise a group of heterotropic, funguslike organisms that are classified with the zoosporic fungi (Mastigomycotina) but in reality are related to the heterokont algae. They are distinguished from other zoosporic fungi by the presence of biflagellate zoospores. Some taxa are nonzoosporic. Asexual reproduction involves the release of zoospores from sporangia; in some taxa the sporangium germinates with outgrowth of a germ tube. Sexual reproduction occurs when an oogonial cell is fertilized by contact with an antheridium, resulting in one or more oospores.

Oomycetes are cosmopolitan, occurring in fresh and salt water, in soil, and as terrestrial parasites of plants. Many species can be grown in pure culture on defined media. There are four orders: The Saprolegniales and Leptomitales are popularly known as water molds. Some species are destructive fish parasites. Many Lagenidiales are parasites of invertebrates and algae. The Peronosporales are primarily plant parasites attacking the root, stem, or leaf, and include some of the more destructive plant pathogens. See Eumycota, Fungi

Oomycetes

[‚ō·ə·mī′sēd·ēz]
(mycology)
A class of the Phycomycetes comprising the biflagellate water molds and downy mildews.
References in periodicals archive ?
lipoferum PCJ2, lograron inhibir a nivel in vitro el crecimiento del oomycete en un 54%, 30% y 50% respectivamente (Cuadro 3, Figura 3).
Horizontal gene transfer facilitated the evolution of plant parasitic mechanisms in the oomycetes.
Zoosporicidal activity of polyflavonoid tannin identified in Lannea coromandelica stem bark against phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces cochlioides.
The database will be expanded in 2006 to include genome sequences for the fungal pathogen Alternaria brassicicola and the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora parasitica, both of which can infect the model plant Arabidopsis.
Pythiosis is undoubtedly a disease that will not be repaired by first intention, by the infectious process and the granulomatous nature of the lesion, so it will always be more aggressive and proliferative, in which case second intention healing is required due to excessive loss or severe tissue involvement, presence of kunkers, fistulous trajectories and excessive granulation tissue, requiring the administration of a medical treatment to aid in the control of the oomycete infection and to promote tissue repair (3).
In Annonaceae, this is the first finding showing the oomycete as a causal agent of roots rot of the soursop in the Northeastern Brazil.
According to GROOTERS (2003), histological findings of pythiosis in dogs can be confused with other oomycete infections.
23], which indicated that Phytophthora citrophthora is the most widely spread oomycete plant pathogen over all the citrus growing areas.
Late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating potato disease in the world.