operant conditioning

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Related to Operant learning: Classical learning

operant conditioning

[′äp·ə·rənt kən′dish·ə·niŋ]
(psychology)
A form of learning in which the subject, in a given situation, tends to respond in a way that produces rewarding effects, reinforcing previous pleasurable experiences. Also known as instrumental conditioning; reinforcement conditioning.

operant conditioning

See CONDITIONING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoolzl, "Operant learning of perceptual sensitization and habituation is impaired in fibromyalgia patients with and without irritable bowel syndrome," Pain, vol.
In operant learning, the reinforcer increases lever pressing as a food-related response; and in respondent learning, the reinforcer may increase the probability of responding with respect to the bell, also a food-related response.
Finally, as I argue below, there is no evidence that in any way suggests "that the kind of learning taking place in early language acquisition cannot be accounted for by Skinnerian reinforcement." On the contrary, the kind of learning that takes place in early language acquisition can almost entirely be accounted for by operant learning principles.
Relative effectiveness of episodic and conjugate reinforcement on child operant learning. Bridges, 4(3), 1-15.
Our phylogenetic history may also influence how well we are physiologically prepared for certain kinds of respondent conditioning and operant learning, such as how readily we respond to reinforcement for aggressive behavior versus our responsiveness to contingencies for other types of behavior.
That is, internal responses thought to be involuntary have been found to be affected by consequences (i.e., operant learning) and subject to voluntary control as well.
Rats treated with endosulfan showed increased aggressive behavior and deficits in operant learning performance (14).
The preceding sections were intended to illustrate the dynamic interaction among respondent and operant learning functions that likely modulate drug abuse.
Keywords: Response-contingent stimulation, response-independent stimulation, child operant learning, concomitant child behavior, efficiency
This paper reviews the recent parent training research in which parents are taught to use principles of operant learning as well as general principles of positive verbal discourse.
In fact, a technology of teaching verbal behavior based generally on the science of operant learning and specifically on Skinner's analysis has already been developed.
Although a number of basic operant studies have been conducted with cognitively intact older adults (e.g., Baron & Menich, 1985; Baron, Menich, & Perone, 1983; Perone & Baron, 1982; Plaud, Gillund, & Ferraro, 2000), to our knowledge, only two basic studies of the degree to which operant learning can occur in older adults with dementia have been published (Ankus & Quarrington, 1972; Burgess, Wearden, Cox, & Rae, 1992) and we know of none that have appeared since 1992.