Opteron

(redirected from Operton)

Opteron

A family of 64-bit x86 CPU chips from AMD, formerly code-named Sledgehammer (part of the Hammer line). Introduced in April 2003, the Opteron fully supports 32-bit applications but requires that programs be optimized and recompiled to take full advantage of the 64 bits. The 64-bit version of Windows, starting with XP, also takes advantage of the increased CPU word size. Intended for servers and high-end workstations, the Opteron competes with Intel's Xeon and Itanium lines. AMD subsequently introduced 64-bit Athlon CPUs (see Athlon).

Multicore Opterons
In 2005, following the introduction of its Athlon dual-core chips, AMD introduced dual-core Opterons with quad-core compatibility (dual cores could be replaced with quad-core chips on the same motherboard). In 2007, it introduced the quad-core models and later came out with six core and 12-core Opterons. See AMD64, Hammer, Xeon and Itanium.
References in periodicals archive ?
"If an agency has adopted an interpretation or application of a statute or rule that goes beyond its plain language or is contrary to the words, Tetra Tech gives a powerful weapon to argue against the interpretation to the agency, on administrative appeals, and in court."<br />In writing the lead opinion in the case, Justice Dan Kelly borrowed language from Justice Rebecca Bradley's dissent in Operton v.
That due-weight deference is required by the state's administrative-procedures statutes.<br />The decision means lawyers handling matters before administrative agencies can challenge how those agencies interpret and apply statutes and regulations by arguing that the rules are not being applied as written, said Lisa Lawless, an appellate attorney at Husch Blackwell in Milwaukee.<br />"This also means that long-held agency interpretations of statutes can now be attacked to the extent they are contrary to the statute or they may be said to re-write the statute," she said."Tetra Techgives a blank slate for those situations."<br />In writing the lead opinion in the case, Justice Dan Kelly borrowed language from Justice Rebecca Bradley's dissent in Operton v.
"I have always used my law degree in a way to help balance the scales of justice."<br />Townsend won a unanimous decision before the Wisconsin Supreme Court in 2017, when the court ruled in favor of Lela Operton, Townsend's client and a former Walgreens employee who had been denied unemployment benefits after being fired.<br />Townsend met Operton while volunteering at the Unemployment Compensation Clinic and went on to handle her case pro-bono.<br />"Operton v.