opisthotonus


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Related to opisthotonus: oculogyric crisis

opisthotonus

[‚ap·əs′thät·ən·əs]
(medicine)
A condition, caused by a tetanic spasm of the back muscles, in which the trunk is arched forward while the head and lower limbs are bent backward.
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In case 3, the child was already 2 years old when he presented with convulsions and opisthotonus.
In 1950, after a decade of 11 other unpublished New Zealand cases of tetanus with two recoveries, and another series treated by basal sedation with 50% surviving, DW Beaven (50) and his Christchurch team supplied a six-year-old boy with anaesthetic doses of tribromoethanol with 350 mg tubocurarine (d-TC) over [greater than or equal to] 12 days, to control his tetanus spasms and severe opisthotonus.
Dijkstra suggests that opisthotonus might "serve as a generic designation for the many paintings of women shown in terminal backward spasms of uncontrollable sexual desire" (101).
Sudden death caused by MFA-containing plants in cattle is characterized by tachycardia, labored breathing, loss of balance, ataxia, muscular tremors, falling, recumbence, pedaling movements, and opisthotonus leading to death (TOKARNIA & DOBEREINER 1986; GAVA et al.
1), stiff motor response, accentuated myotactic reflex, protusion of third eyelid, enophthalmos, erect ears, drawn back lips, tragic face, trismus, increased salivation, dysphagia, strong reaction to tactile and auditory stimulation of even mild nature, opisthotonus posture, muscle contraction, inability in prehension and swallowing and distended abdomen at various stages under treatment.
infection, were depression, polyuria, torticollis, opisthotonus, paralysis, trembling, and death.
However, because its use can result in poor muscle relaxation, muscle tremors, myotonic contractions, opisthotonus, and rough recovery, ketamine is rarely used alone (7-10); it is often paired with drugs such as alpha-adrenergic agonists, benzodiazepines, and propofol for chemical restraint and induction of anesthesia in birds.