Opopanax

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Opopanax

 

a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Umbelliferae. The leaves are pinnate with entire or deeply separated segments. The petals are yellow and have recurved tips. The fruit is obovate or round. There are three or four species, found primarily in the Mediterranean area. One species, O. armeniacum, is found in the USSR, growing on rocky slopes in Armenia. The Mediterranean species O. chironium contains a substance in the roots that is used in perfumery.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dans L'Opoponax, l'ecriture revit au present une enfance ou les enfants sont debarrasses des parents, ainsi que le signale Mary McCarthy (28).
On dit qu'on est l'opoponax. On dit qu'on cherche des musiques pour les poemes qu'on connait.
Dans L'Opoponax, son premier roman, dont la publication precede de neuf ans cette declaration, la pratique sexuelle interdite se manifeste d'abord par deux noms accoles, Catherine Legrand Valerie Borge sans ponctuation entre les deux (32).
In The Opoponax the translator used "you" instead of "one" even though, as she has noted, the use of "one" in English is no heavier than in French; and in Les Guerilleres the feminine plural elle is most often translated as "the women" rather than "they"--both of which offer a different valence than elle.
." This similarity may have led Wittig's translator to use the English word you to render the ubiquitous on of L'Opoponax. Wittig's subsequent annoyance over this choice suggests an important difference between the two, a difference I suspect is rooted in divergent narrative persons.
At the same time, these critics underline the innovative nature of L'Opoponax without making it into a sort of meteorite, fallen to earth from a radical otherness: Wittig, starting from her experience as a little girl, has produced a "form-meaning" which transforms the cultural models of childhood and also those of the narrative of childhood - and this is valid for men as much as for women.
of L'Opoponax, by Monique Wittig, in L'Express (30 Nov.-6 Dec.
Among other treasured Daughters Press titles on my bookshelf, I have copies of Monique Wittig's The Opoponax, Bertha Harris' Lover and June Arnold's Sister Gin and The Cook and the Carpenter.