Oppian


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Oppian

(ŏp`ēən), fl. 2d cent., Greek poet. He is the author of a didactic poem (in five books of hexameters) on fishing called Halieutica. Two other poems, formerly attributed to Oppian, are now believed to be by other writers—Cynegetica (on hunting), perhaps by another poet named Oppian, and Ixeutica (on birdcatching).
References in periodicals archive ?
Near the Colosseum, students skied down the Oppian Hill.
The site chosen is the Oppian Hill, which overlooks the Colosseum.
The Domus Aurea ran from the Palatine and Velia to the edge of the Oppian, then east along the Servian Wall to the Caelian.
Aurispa made at least two trips to Constantinople to collect manuscripts and sent to Sicily religious works by Saint John Chrysostom, Saint Simeon, and Saint Gregory Nazianzus, and to Venice secular works, such as the book of history by Procopius of Caesarea, the treatise on horsemanship by Xenophon, poetry by Callimacus, Pindar, and Oppian, as well as the complete works of Plato, Proclus Diadochus, and Lucian.
It is exceptionally common, however, in the scholia on Plato, Oppian, Thucydides, and, above all, Lucian.
Although they were the leading source for knowledge about animals and while they might contain information on natural history gleaned from the works of Aristotle, Pliny, Oppian and Aelian, few of their descriptions were based upon the observation of real animals.
and her disagreements with her flightier younger sister about the values of feminine primping offer significant allusions to the heated debates over the repeal of the austere Oppian sumptuary law (195 B.
We find one in Oppian, an author with whose work Porphyry, who wrote extensively on the Homeric epics, may have been familiar.