Oppidum


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Oppidum

 

in the period of the Roman Empire, a temporary city fortress surrounded by a moat and a rampart. The shape and layout of an oppidum depended on the terrain in which it was located. A Celtic fortress of the second and first centuries B.C. with stone walls and a rectangular plan was also called an oppidum.

REFERENCE

Haverfield, F. Ancient Town Planning. Oxford, 1913.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caesar now tried to goad Vercingetorix into open battle by laying siege to one oppidum after another, massacring or enslaving their inhabitants when they fell.
Main, the part-ruined L'Abbaye de Foncaude; above left, view from the Oppidum d'Enservne towards the pre-Roman hilltop settlement; above right, detail from the oldest cooperative in France
In the dedicatory letter to Oppidum Batavorum, Smetius aptly describes his collection as "proverbiorum, apophthegmatum factorumque nostratium memorandonum collectio."
Caesar mentions two definite divisions of settlement: the oppidum, or town, and the vicus, a village or hamlet.
Tritium Magallum was a small town, and there is no reason to doubt, despite the enthusiasm of some scholars, that it was anything other than a mere oppidum stipendiarium prior to Vespasian's universal grant of Latin Rights to the Iberian provinces in A.D.
The narrow band of land claimed by the Kelheim oppidum stretches for nearly 2 miles along the base of a limestone plateau.
As the speaker of parliament Pellegrini entered the limelight as the builder of controversial underground garages in the Bratislava Castle on the site of the former Celtic oppidum.