opportunity cost

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opportunity cost

the opportunities foregone in undertaking one activity measured in terms of the other possibilities that might have been pursued using the same expenditure of resources. While opportunity cost is mainly a concept in economics, it also applies more generally to human existence. For example, given the finitude of time in the human life-span and the impossibility of doing many activities more than one at a time or other than in one-to-one interactions, opportunity costs are involved in many human activities, not only those in which economic resources are involved.
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Critically, economics teaches that the relevant cost is what we call the opportunity cost, which is not the number of hours a task takes you but rather what you forgo by not pursuing the next best use of your time.
The potential alpha stocks are those blue chips with relatively lower required returns based on prevailing opportunity costs.
Opportunity cost is defined as a benefit that could have been received, but was given up in order to take another course of action.
The vision of cyber sovereignty in China is costly, with opportunity costs, and not reproducible elsewhere, especially in developing countries
Every business has an opportunity cost: the expense associated with lost opportunities --the deals that didn't close and the prospects who walked right by your storefront or were turned off by your website or salesperson.
I have paraphrased the third most common response as 'opportunity cost.' Opportunity cost exists when a company is faced with making a decision between two choices each with their own set of pros and cons.
(109) In other words, Company C's pivot has opportunity costs that will likely drive the fund's decision.
The total opportunity costs of caregiving are then calculated by multiplying the time each individual spent providing care by his/her wage, and then summing over all individuals, using survey weights to obtain nationally representative estimates.
The purpose of the survey was to assess the respondent's understanding of opportunity cost, arguably one of the most important concepts in the introductory economics curriculum.
Opportunity cost is the profit forgone by making one particular decision rather than an alternative decision.
"These are opportunity costs, damage to brand and reputation, consumer losses from fraud, the opportunity costs of service disruptions "cleaning up" after cyber incidents, and the cost of increased spending on cyber security."
Limits on corporate optionality impose costs from lost opportunity potential; these lost opportunities are commonly referred to as opportunity costs. Opportunity costs can actually loom larger than any financing cost differentials and impose one or both of two types of risk on a business:
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