sexism

(redirected from Oppression of women)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

sexism

  1. any attitudes and actions which overtly or covertly discriminate against women or men on the grounds of their sex or GENDER – see SEX DISCRIMINATION.
  2. any devaluation or denigration of women or men, but particularly women, which is embodied in institutions and social relationships, e.g. the sexist use of language, such as the male personal pronoun, ‘he’, to refer to men and women. See also PATRIARCHY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oppression of women from Saudi Arabia and Turkey - though on different scales - shows that it is not the Islamic faith that represses women.
The Vice President said that discrimination based on caste, untouchability, corruption, oppression of women, the ill effects of black money, are stigmatizing our society even after 70 years of independence.
I'd like to call myself a feminist, a member of a movement that has progressed to fight against the oppression of women, but I don't think that I am.
"The burqa is not a sign of freedom of religion, but a sign of the freedom and oppression of women. We can not accept this in Germany," Dennis Gladiator, domestic political speaker of the Christian Democrats, told German news (https://www.welt.de/regionales/hamburg/article157739673/Hamburgs-CDU-auf-Konfrontationskurs-zu-de-Maiziere.html) outlet Die Welt in August.
The study explored reasons behind suppression of their reproductive health decisions and perceptions about existing socio-cultural and religious factors supporting oppression of women in urban society.
Nor can we let the hateful ideology of radical Islam -- its oppression of women, gays, children and nonbelievers -- be allowed to reside or spread within our own countries.
By acknowledging the oppression of women, to different degrees, in social systems organized in the name of religion and also rejecting a perspective that seeks to promote Western values as the only means of liberating them, the author is able to define a new way.
Church scandals, including the oppression of women and the sexual abuse of children, have challenged many people to rethink where their moral authority may come from.
The "bra-burning" protests of the '60s highlighted the oppression of women and were an appropriate response to the stubborn maintenance of patriarchy, despite many years of campaigning against it in more traditional ways.
Elizabeth Reid Boy and Gayle Letherby conclude that stay-at-home mothering, which has often been portrayed as a site for the oppression of women, is being claimed as a location of feminist activism.
Using Senegal as socio-political microcosm of post-independent African societies and film as an aesthetic medium to examine corruption, nepotism, oppression of women, and religious intolerance, Sembene focuses on education as instruments of colonial domination and agents of destruction of African cultural heritage.
Anger at the "systemic oppression of women within the Catholic church" has prompted a group of 12 Irish priests to issue a statement of protest calling for a free and open discussion of the exclusion of women from decision-making and the priesthood in the church.