optical tweezers

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optical tweezers

[′äp·tə·kəl ′twēz·ərz]
(optics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The process of optical trapping -- or optical tweezing, as it is often known -- involves sculpting a beam of light into a narrow point that produces a strong electromagnetic field.
This type of optical trapping is due to combined forces of direct gradient-force trapping and asymmetric photorefractive forces of electro-phoresis and dielectro-phoresis.
Although optical trapping of single cells may have negligible biological effects, it is highly dependent on the wavelength of laser light and the dosage of irradiation to which cells are exposed (40-42).
In contrast to other plasmonic tweezers, we find that BNAs permit particle trapping, manipulation and sorting utilizing only the optical parameter space, namely, low input power densities, wavelength and polarization," said Brian Roxworthy, a graduate student in Toussaint's research group and first author on the paper, "Application of Plasmonic Bowtie Nanoantenna Arrays for Optical Trapping, Stacking, and Sorting," which appears in the journal Nano Letters.
HOT technology is based on optical trapping which works by using light to create microscopic "tweezers" that can manipulate particles in the microscopic field of view.
The new techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM; or scanning force microscopy) [1-4] and optical trapping (optical or laser tweezers) [5, 6] have allowed us to locate individual atoms and molecules on surfaces and to manipulate cells directly.
This research will open new opportunities for precise control of induced birefringence, which can be widely used in material processing, microscopy, and optical trapping and manipulation.
We propose to study the interfacial and droplet dynamics in colloid-polymer mixtures using optical trapping techniques.
Upcoming issues of BioOptics World magazine will cover molecular imaging, spectroscopy, micros copy, cytometry, optical trapping, biosensing, microfluidics, cell biology, genomics, proteomics, and tissue engineering.
This approach involves optical trapping technology capable of sensing single antigen-antibody bonds.
3-D optical trapping technique described in Optics Express holds potential for applications in energy, medicine
Other key features of the updated PFS include 52 objective choices and an expanded fluorescence spectral range of 340-750nm, creating options for using FURA dyes, IR probes, or Q-Dots technology in addition to multi-photon imaging and optical trapping techniques.

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