anticoagulant

(redirected from Oral anticoagulants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Oral anticoagulants: Rivaroxaban, warfarin

anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
..... Click the link for more information.
). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
..... Click the link for more information.
) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative effectiveness and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: propensity weighted nationwide cohort study.
Oral anticoagulants did not get adequate attention for the AF patients after coronary stenting.
The retrospective analysis included medical records of outpatients who underwent total hip and knee joint replacement in the period from 2009-2015 at the leading Russian clinics and who received oral anticoagulants for prevention of thrombus formation.
A very small percentage of the dentists were able to identify the newer oral anticoagulants, which showed their unawareness to the current evolution in oral anticoagulation therapy.
Some facilities have developed emergency protocols for acute or life- or limb-threatening bleeding events for patients taking any Factor IIa or Factor Xa oral anticoagulant, which involves the following step-wise treatment approach (Kumar, Smith, & Henry, 2015; Vilchez, Gallego, & Lip, 2014).
From a biological point of view there are found the following: cholestasis, hepatoprive syndrome, prolongation of the prothrombin time (the patient being currently at home under oral anticoagulant treatment), azote retention syndrome, discreet muscular lysis syndrome, hyperglycaemia, bicytopenia (normocytic hypochromic anaemia + thrombocytopenia) (Table 1).
The introduction of additional oral anticoagulants for specific patient populations and specific clinical conditions gives patients and their healthcare providers choices that were previously unavailable; however, their introduction has not been an unqualified success.
Overall the study found that the use of oral anticoagulants has improved over the last decade since the last Euro Heart Survey was performed.
The use of old oral anticoagulants is always controversial because of the low therapeutic index; an excessive overdose is linked to the occurrence of hemorrhage.
Glyn Davies, chair of the AF All Party Parliamentary Group and MP for Montgomeryshire said: "The outlook for patients with AF has improved over the last decade, especially with dia-gnosis and the introduction of new oral anticoagulants.
Recently two oral anticoagulants have been approved to reduce the risk of stroke, with several others in late-stage clinical development.
0 in patients not on oral anticoagulants and without any coagulopathy.