agent

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agent

a person representing a business concern, esp a travelling salesman

Agent

 

in Soviet civil law, a party in a contract of agency. The agent’s duties include the performance of specified legal acts, for example, contracts of sale and management of property, in the name of and on the account of a principal party. The agent may be a legally competent (sui juris) citizen or a legal person (if this is allowed by the latter’s charter or statute). The actions performed by the agent directly generate, change, or extinguish rights and obligations of the principal.

The agent is bound to perform the agency in exact conformity with the principal’s instructions, carry out the agency personally, although in instances provided for by law the responsibilities may be transferred to another person (art. 68 of the RSFSR Civil Code), inform the principal upon demand of progress in performing the agency, submit a report on performance of the agency, and transfer to the principal any property obtained in connection with performance of the agency.

agent

One who is empowered to enter into binding transactions on behalf of another (usually called the principal).

agent

(networking)
In the client-server model, the part of the system that performs information preparation and exchange on behalf of a client or server. Especially in the phrase "intelligent agent" it implies some kind of automatic process which can communicate with other agents to perform some collective task on behalf of one or more humans.

agent

A software routine that waits in the background and performs an action when a specified event occurs. For example, agents could transmit a summary file on the first day of the month or monitor incoming data and alert the user when a certain transaction has arrived. Agents are also called "intelligent agents," "personal agents" and "bots." See mobile agent, bot and workflow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the subjects, 44 patients were on oral hypoglycemic agents, 16 had been on insulin therapy for at least 5 years and 40 were on oral hypoglycemics as well as insulin therapy.
Those on TZDs and oral hypoglycemic agents also had a significantly reduced risk (HR 0.
This product represents an interesting opportunity for Ranbaxy, in which we will offer a number of strengths of this oral hypoglycemic agent to support dosing flexibility that will benefit both prescribers and patients.
Based on the approval of the partial change, the indication of TENELIAA has changed to type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Guideline for Clinical Evaluation of Oral Hypoglycemic Agents , and TENELIAA is now available for combination therapy with existing oral hypoglycemic agents, such as biganides, ?
Drug Interactions with the following drugs or classes of drugs may occur: Antiarrhythmics, Anticonvulsants, Anti-HIV Agents, Antimycobacterials, Antineoplastics, Antipsychotics, Benzodiazepines, Calcium Channel Blockers, Gastric Acid Suppressors/Neutralizers, Gastrointestinal Motility Agents, HMG CoA-Reductase Inhibitors, Macrolide Antibiotics, Oral Hypoglycemic Agents, Polyenes, Opiate Analgesics.
5 percent and no longer needing insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents (blood sugar-lowering medications).
Whitehurst Professor of Medicine and professor of physiology "The data so far suggest that if both mom and the fetus have a GCK mutation, you may want to forego treatment [with oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin], and even put mom on a high-carb diet, because the baby needs a high glucose level.
The primary end point--glycemic control at 12 months without the use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin--was achieved by significantly more patients in the gastric bypass group (93%) than in the sleeve gastrectomy group (47%).
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether use of oral hypoglycemic agents is associated with an altered breast cancer risk in women.
Currently, there are six major classes of oral hypoglycemic agents available in the United States: agents that stimulate insulin secretion (sulfonylureas and rapid-acting secretagogues); reduce hepatic glucose production (biguanides); delay digestion and absorption of intestinal carbohydrates ([alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors); improve insulin action (thiazolidin-ediones [TZDs]); or inhibit glucagon release (dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 [DPP-4] inhibitors).
Gingko and garlic have increased the risk of bleeding with anticoagulants, while garlic has increased the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol and enhanced the effect of oral hypoglycemic agents.