Orbital Parameters

Parameters, Orbital

 

quantities that characterize the orientation of the orbit of a man-made or natural celestial body, the orbit’s dimensions and shape, and the position of the body in the orbit. In astronomy the orbit’s elements are usually taken as the orbital parameters.

References in periodicals archive ?
Athena s standard Orbit Adjust Module capability can perform multiple precise deliveries of CubeSats to unique orbital parameters, the initial phasing for constellation deployments, as well as deploying CubeSats in large or small groups.
The QCM fit to the orbital parameters of all known planets of a multi-planet system determines the total angular momentum of that system, a value which can be used to predict whether more planets can be expected and/or whether the equivalent of an Oort cloud is required.
It was calibrated with care so that one could set it with conventional astronomical orbital parameters, and there was even provision for determining the time of entry into the Earth's shadow.
A small error in the measured position and estimated geocentric velocity can give larger errors in the values of the orbital parameters 'a' and 'p'.
Simulations using a state-of-the-art climate model show that the high temperature and precipitation during the super interglacials cannot be explained by Earth's orbital parameters or variations in atmospheric greenhouse gases alone, which geologists typically see driving the glacial/interglacial pattern during ice ages.
The orbital parameters, combined with a high number of coordinated satellites, allow constant access to telecommunications services from anywhere on Earth.
Only files representing orbital parameters for each image and a set of not well defined coefficients have been available to the authors.
This project was developed as an ongoing student project to study of the orbital parameters of visual binary systems.
1981, Monsoon climate of the Early Holocene: Climate experiment with Earth's orbital parameters for 9000 years ago: Science, v.
The findings "appear to be related to changes in the planet's tilt and orbital parameters in recent epochs, that last a few tens to a few hundreds of millions of years," says planetary scientist Jim Bell of Cornell University.
Using our orbital parameters, we separate the combined binary spectra into primary and secondary spectra and then assign individual spectral classifications.
The orbital parameters, combined with a high number of coordinated satellites allow constant access to telecommunications services from anywhere on Earth.