cellulitis

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cellulitis

[‚sel·yə′līd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of connective tissue, especially the loose subcutaneous tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient was initially admitted to the general medicine unit and placed on broad-spectrum antibiotics for possible orbital cellulitis.
The differential diagnosis in this case includes cellulitis, particularly preseptal or orbital cellulitis, sarcoidosis, thyroid ophthalmopathy, rheumatologic disorders, idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS) (also known as orbital pseudotumor), metastatic disease (particularly with the patient's history of breast cancer), and tumors, including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, lymphangioma, liposarcoma, and lymphoma.
Orbital cellulitis occurs in the following three situations: (1) extension of an infection from the periorbital structures, most commonly arising from the paranasal sinuses (the face, globe and lacrimal sac may also be a source of infection); (2) direct inoculation of the orbit from trauma or surgery; and (3) haematogenous spread from bacteraemia (bacteria in the blood).
A preliminary diagnosis of orbital cellulitis was made, and urgent computed tomography (CT) was requested.
In case of orbital cellulitis the patient is unwell, with malaise, and raised temperature.
Orbital cellulitis (stage II) manifests as eyelid swelling, proptosis, and chemosis, with limited or no impairment of extraocular movement.
Chandler et al defined the five stages of orbital complications of sinusitis as inflammatory edema, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess, and cavernous sinus thrombosis.
Our patient's clinical picture suggested the presence of an acute orbital cellulitis complicating an infected frontal sinus mucocele.
Considerable controversy exists over the need for prophylactic antibiotics after midface fractures to prevent orbital cellulitis.
The majority of cases are unilateral, but bilateral orbital cellulitis may occur.
External eye manifestations are quite common and range from the innocuous trichomegaly (long eye lashes) to proptosis caused by orbital cellulitis or lymphoma (life-threatening if not managed appropriately).