Order of Interference

order of interference

[′ȯrd·ər əv ‚in·tər′fir·əns]
(optics)
The difference in the number of wavelengths along the paths of two constructively interfering rays of light.

Order of Interference

 

the path difference of interfering light rays divided by the light’s wavelength. The orders of interference considered most often are those equal to integers—that is, where the path difference is an integral number of wavelengths—because the interference effect is strongest in such cases. If the rays are reflected by a surface in their path, the resulting phase difference, divided by , is included in the order of interference.

References in periodicals archive ?
where N is the order of interference which cannot be obtained directly through the measurement.
In case of 2 km/min, it can be understood easily that the order of interference changed from 0 to 1 at around 200 cm where the phase shift changed from 360[degrees] to 0[degrees].
As described previously, the order of interference immediately below the neck-like deformation is known to be 3.