Ordinances


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Ordinances

 

(1) In France and England, the designation for royal edicts. They appeared in France in the 12th century, but until the mid-13th century were applied on the domains of feudal seigneurs only with the consent of the latter. In the 15th century, parliaments began to register ordinances, in order to invest them with the force of law. They were issued until the French Revolution and then again during the Restoration.

In England, beginning with the 13th century, ordinances were legal acts which, unlike the statutes issued by Parliament, contained royal edicts not requiring parliamentary approval. Their relation to the statutes was a subordinate, secondary one. In 1537 ordinances were made equal in juridical power to the statutes.

(2) In a number of foreign states, the designation for legal acts passed by higher legislative and executive bodies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Raja said she had presented only those ordinances to the House that were on the order of the day.
After the meeting, Nepali Congress leaders told reporters that they hoped that the government would not come up with new ordinances before the next parliamentary session.
The City Council approved a first ordinance in November, requiring hotels near LAX to increase workers' pay to $9.
Texas that struck down sodomy laws in part on the basis of personal privacy, housing ordinances based on moral values alone no longer hold up to constitutional scrutiny, says Jon Davidson, legal director for the gay rights group Lambda Legal.
49) Indeed, looking back through the changes that occurred in American cities since the era of segregation ordinances, it is important to remember that the West Ordinance supporters did not even envision the creation of anything resembling a clearly defined or contiguous black ghetto, unlike the creators of contemporary colonial "black towns" and South African locations.
In 1975, the city in which your property is situated passed a new ordinance requiring that all new buildings of 4 or more stories in size have an elevator available for its tenants.
The ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is interested in accessing ordinance data for comparative purposes in the insurance industry," said Martin.
Under the ordinance, municipal buildings will need to follow designated green building design principles designated by the LEED point system, which the city hopes will translate into cost-saving measures in the future, says Jared Blumenfeld, director of the San Francisco Department of the Environment.
As a result of their research, jurisdictions have applied C&D ordinances to one or more of the following categories:
My insurance agent has recommended that I purchase property insurance for ordinance or law.
The concurrence of Justice O'Connor that Justice Breyer joined is noteworthy for the following suggestions it offers on how the Chicago ordinance and other gang loitering ordinances might be structured to pass constitutional muster:
There are significant moral problems raised by gang-loitering ordinances.