ordinary language philosophy

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ordinary language philosophy

a detailed analysis of language in use. Also referred to as linguistic philosophy (or analysis), and Oxford philosophy the term applies to a group of Oxford philosophers (including Austin and Ryle) influenced by the philosophy of WITTGENSTEIN. The aim of this ordinary language philosophy is to analyse natural language as a flexibly rule-governed practice. This approach contrasts with that of the logical positivists (see LOGICAL POSITIVISM), who wished to rid language of metaphysics by reducing it to an ‘object language’ capable of rigorous logical investigation. Ordinary language philosophers prefer to dissolve rather than solve problems, demonstrating that puzzlement often occurs only when metaphysics is used. Their own image of it is as a form of philosophy dispelling linguistic confusions, a view reflected in the title of Austin's How to Do Things with Words (1962).

Approaches in sociology which emphasize the importance of everyday language and talk (e.g. ETHNOMETHODOLOGY and CONVERSATIONAL ANALYSIS), have been influenced by ordinary language philosophy (see also SPEECH ACTS).

References in periodicals archive ?
However, I think Hallen's second specifics of the ordinary language philosophy, which is that 'as once was the case with English-language ordinary-language philosophy, there need be no presumption that this kind of study will either solve or dissolve the traditional problems of philosophy' (xxxviii) takes care of this concern.
In saying this, I want to insist that The Names is not a mere "example" of the conceptual scheme of ordinary-language philosophy (indeed, this philosophy resists conceptual schemes altogether).
The latter philosopher is best-known for his contributions to ordinary-language philosophy and metaphysics.
They were intellectual: (a) logical positivism and early Wittgenstein, which Popper thought were not logical enough--they had no way to falsify theories; (b) Russell and his philosophy, which Popper admired--they tried to solve problems; and (c) ordinary-language philosophy and later Wittgenstein, which Popper disdained--they saw only linguistic puzzles, not philosophical problems.
Out of ordinary-language philosophy comes ordinary-language literary criticism.
Ordinary-language philosophy is, in its way, a response to the impossible nature of philosophical inquiry.