Ore Chute

ore chute

[′ȯr ‚shüt]
(mining engineering)
An inclined passage for the transfer of ore to a lower level.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ore Chute

 

a vertical or inclined mining excavation for transporting ore and other useful minerals by force of gravity. Hatch devices or feeders are installed in the lower portions of ore chutes for loading ore into hauling vessels or onto conveyors.

Depending on use and the length of service, a distinction is made between capital and block ore chutes. When raised deposits are mined by the opencut method, capital quarry ore chutes are used to transfer ore from the quarry to the loading sites in galleries. Underground capital ore chutes transport ore from one or several levels to the major haulage horizon.

REFERENCE

Kar’ernye rudospuski. Moscow, 1969.

M. D. FUGZAN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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