oreo

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oreo

cookie; pejoratively refers to obsequious Black with white aspirations. [Am. Culture: Flexner, 49]
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Oreo's mother and grandmother influence her developing identity, she still lacks knowledge of her father; it is he who holds the "secret of her birth," although Oreo's mother could not be unaware of this secret, having herself been present at Oreo's conception.
Oreo's black grandfather, James, earned his living conning Jewish customers out of their money with items catering to their religious practice.
Through Oreo's satirical performances of blackness and Jewishness, Ross seems to uphold the notion of race as social construction, yet at the same time, she allows Oreo access to Jewishness merely through paternity--which does not make Oreo Jewish at all.
Held in front of a mirror, Oreo's letter would read: "dear mom cut the crap" (24).
This scene, although demonstrative of Oreo's reversal of sexual oppression, represents a significant flaw in this novel of female empowerment and subversion of patriarchal culture.
In fact, the repeated reference to Oreo's virginity suggests the text's elevation of women who are untainted by sexual contact with men; Oreo's extraordinary nature may correlate with her sexual state: she may be a virgin because she is an exceptional young woman, or she may be an exceptional young woman because she is a virgin.
As Oreo's uncle attests, "She sure got womb, that little mother.
Oreo's consciously chosen virginity; her comfort with her sexuality; and her strength, intelligence, and self-determination create new possibilities for women--whether they be mixed-race women, black women of various religions, or Jewish women of various racial heritages; the text offers its mixed protagonist as a metaphor for individuals who travel between traditionally opposing shores--those of black and white, masculine and feminine, Jew and gentile.
In many respects, Oreo's racial heritage is taken for granted; it is not taboo, tragedy, or trophy.
After all, what is ultimately important to Oreo's identity has little to do with her predetermined utopian goal--finding her father and suddenly knowing the secret of her birth--which, after additional searching, she learns was the result of artificial insemination, again suggesting the text's difficulty in supporting the possibility of successful interracial romance.
Regardless of the winning color, Oreo's spring line will have the same taste that makes it America's most popular cookie, selling 150 million packages annually and using 47 million pounds of white creme filling.
For more information, or to cast your vote in Cyberspace, visit Oreo's Internet site at: http://www.