Halocarbon

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halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aust, professor of biochemistry at MSU, that the fungus might well degrade organohalides as well as lignin.
Aust, Bumpus and two students, Ming Tien and David Wright, labeled the carbon rings of the organohalides with carbon-14, which is mildly radioactive.
Such disruptors include many commonly used chemicals, such as organohalides, pesticides, and phthalates that are used in plastics.