Orientale Basin

Orientale Basin

(or-ee-en-tah -lee, oh-ree-) The youngest lunar basin, only partly filled by mare lava. The concentric ring structure of mountains and the ejecta blanket – the Hevelius formation – are exceptionally well preserved. Orientale is situated on the western limb of the Moon and is visible from Earth only at times of favorable libration.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mare Orientale basin is said to be over 3 billion years old and about 950 km wide.
The picture was taken by Vikram, the spacecraft's lander and shows the Mare Orientale basin and Apollo craters.
This alignment of craters points back to the western side of the Imbrium Basin--so could these be a string of large secondary craters like the ones radiating from the Orientale Basin on the lunar farside?
The team's results pertain to the Orientale basin, an expansive, bull's eye-shaped depression on the southwestern edge of the moon, just barely visible from Earth.
While passing the Earth, Galileo will probably get good spectral measurements of Earth's moon, enabling comparisons of mineralogical differences between the moon's near and far sides, including photos of a previously unmapped strip on the near side south of huge Orientale basin.
Their disappearance is probably related to the location of the basin near the younger and larger Orientale basin. The latter's ejecta swept across this area, knocking down and covering preexisting terrain with torrents of debris.
The research, led by graduate student William Vaughan, shows that the impact event that formed the Orientale basin on the Moon's western edge and far side produced a sea of melted rock 220 miles across and at least six miles deep.
Originally, the location was unknown, but LRO scientists discovered the small depression it made near the crater Sundman V in the Orientale Basin ejecta blanket.
Tour stops included in this breathtaking journey across the moon's surface are: Orientale Basin, Shackleton crater, South Pole-Aitken Basin, Tycho crater, Aristarchus Plateau, Mare Serenitatis, Compton-Belkovich volcano, Jackson crater and Tsiolkovsky crater.
And now, Chandrayaan-1, which orbited the moon for almost 10 months until it failed in August, seems to have found the mother lode - vast outcrops of plagioclase crystal along a mountain range inside the moon's 930-kilometre-wide Orientale basin.
In fact, on the floor of Clavius is a short chain of three barely overlapping secondary craters--the largest is 7 km wide--that point back to their likely source, the Orientale Basin.
Known as the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, NASA's guest instrument aboard Chandrayaan-1 has taken a new composite image, which provides new information about the Orientale Basin region of the moon.