Orion molecular cloud

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Orion molecular cloud

(OMC-1) A dense cloud of neutral molecular hydrogen lying slightly behind, but in contact with, the Orion nebula. It is part of a system of molecular clouds in the Orion constellation, and is an example of a photodissociation region seen face-on. It has a total mass of about 500 solar masses and has a temperature ranging up to 100 K. It is a very bright infrared source at a wavelength of 50 μm with a luminosity 105 times greater than the Sun's. It is likely that the Trapezium stars condensed from the same molecular cloud. Also associated with OMC-1 are the strong infrared sources, the BN object and Kleinmann-Low nebula, which together form the BNKL complex. Higher resolution measurements indicate that the center of the KL nebula consists of a cluster of small infrared sources that may be evolving toward the stage the Trapezium stars have already reached.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of this nebulosity, along with many other objects that extend throughout Orion such as the Horsehead Nebula (B33) and the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024) are associated, and collectively known as the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex.
In 1994, Hans Bloemen of the Space Research Organization in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and his colleagues used a telescope aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) to analyze a series of broad emission lines from the Orion molecular cloud complex, the nearest stellar nursery to Earth (SN: 2/4/95, p.