Orlando Innamorato


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Orlando Innamorato

Boiardo’s epic combining Carolingian chivalry and Arthurian motifs. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Innamorato]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
I first demonstrate how the Furioso problematizes allegory through engagement with the purely fictional narrative history created by Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato.
In a crucial moment in I:26, Don Quixote associates himself with the Saracen king Agramante of Boiardo's Orlando innamorato.
The origins of Ariosto's poem are first seen in the French chansons de geste and later in Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato.
Sacchi separates the latter into concluded (finito) and open-ended (non finito), pointing to the model provided by Boiardo's unfinished Orlando innamorato.
Yet the fact that the author posits a direct relation between these earlier works and the Orlando Furioso, bypassing Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato as the main direct source, may seem less convincing.
Everson discusses the presence, significance, and impact of the themes of love and war (personified as Venus and Mars), as well as questions concerning dynastic matters, in Teseida, Morgante, Orlando Innamorato, and Mambriano.
Julia Kisacky's book offers a systematic treatment of the magical and the fantastic elements in two of the most popular epic poems of the Italian Renaissance: Boiardo's Orlando innamorato and Ariosto's Orlando furioso.
E significativo che un prodotto cosi incondito potesse venir stampato a una data in cui non solo la grande maggioranza dei poemi cavallereschi anonimi, ma anche i grandi Morgante e Orlando Innamorato erano passati sotto i torchi.
Beecher, Massimo Ciavolella, and Roberto Fedi, "Introduction"; Dennis Looney, "Ariosto and the Classics in Ferrara"; Antonio Franceschetti, "The Orlando innamorato and the Genesis of the Furioso"; Alberto Casadei, "The History of the Furioso"; Giorgio Masi, "'The Nightingale in a Cage': Ariosto and the Este Court"; Monica Farnetti, "Ariosto: Landscape Artist"; Daniel Javitch, "The Advertising of Fictionality in Orlando furioso"; Elissa B.
In the last essay of the first section, "Tasso's Armida and the Victory of Romance," Jo Ann Cavallo traces the antecedents of this Tassian figure (from Circe in the Odyssey to Floriana in Tasso's own Rinaldo, by way of Angelica in Orlando innamorato, Carandina in Cieco da Ferrara's Mambriano, Alcina in Orlando furioso, and Elpidia in Trissino's L'Italia liberata da' Goti), to expose many differing details and offer a novel interpretation of the maga.
Boiardo, for example, had done it with Rinaldo and Angelica in the Orlando innamorato, as had Cieco da Ferrara with Rinaldo and Carandina in Mambriano.
Above and below this scene are images from Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando innamorato (part II, canto VII-VIII), featuring Fiordelisa and Brandimarte.

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