Orléanists

(redirected from Orleanist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Orléanists

 

a monarchist group in France; at the time of the Restoration, supporters of the claims of Louis Philippe of Orléans to the throne: during the Revolution of 1830 they succeeded in having him proclaimed king.

Representing the interests of the financial aristocracy, the Orléanists were the ruling group in France during the July Monarchy (1830–48). In the Second Republic (1848–52), together with the Legitimists, supporters of the Bourbon dynasty, they constituted the reactionary “party of order,” whose policy helped establish the Second Empire. Later, sharing the views of the Versaillais, the Orléanists took part in suppressing the Paris Commune of 1871. In the 1870’s they helped prepare the abortive monarchist coup headed by M. E. P. MacMahon. After participating in the Boulangist movement of the end of the 1880’s, they left the political scene.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Burgundians, notorious for a propaganda machine that has coloured the history of the conflict between them and the Orleanists to the modern era, were particularly successful at promulgating the story that Louis was a sorcerer.
In his description of Orleanist foreign policy, Guizot decried the expansionism of both Louis XIV and Napoleon and contended that respect for "the public law of Europe" was for "every well-regulated government not only an imperative duty, but a necessary precaution.
Terme, the city's Orleanist mayor, rewarded Monfalcon with the position of librarian of the smaller of the city's two libraries, the Library of the Palais des Arts.
htm); Lorentias; orientals (OED oriental, often capitalised); Orleanist (OED); relations (OED relation); rotalines (OED rotaline); serotinal (OED); tailerons (OED taileron); tensorial (OED tensor); Terniolas; Tiroleans (Web3, tyrolean); Tornelias; Triolenas.
The Orleanist prime minister himself might have been a little surprised at this choice.
Le Figaro: "The Estates General, deadlocked among the Legitimist, Orleanist, and Bonapartist candidates, today offered the throne of France to Prince Louis Napoleon of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha .
As Inspector of Historical Monuments under the July Monarchy, Prosper Merimee traveled extensively throughout France and became keenly aware of how Orleanist policies transformed the country's social and economic power structure.
Beginning with the Revolution, therefore, and with a few notable exceptions (the post-Restoration salon of Juliette Recamier in particular), the clientele of Parisian salons reflected the political cleavages of the era: legitimist, Bonapartist, Orleanist, Republican, and all their intermediary variations.
She devoted herself entirely to Prince Talleyrand and acted as his hostess when he became ambassador to London after the Orleanist Louis-Philippe was made king of the French in 1830.
A forgotten pamphlet of 1840, which carries an oblique warning to Wordsworth's countrymen to look to their defences in the uncertain climate of post-Napoleonic France, offers a convenient pretext for exploring the poet's wider views on French politics in his later years, as the restored Bourbon monarchy of 1815 gave way to the Orleanist government of Louis-Philippe, the 'Citizen King', after the July Revolution (1830), and a Bonapartist revival became increasingly possible as French affairs drifted through the 1840s towards the year of revolutions (1848), and the eventual emergence of Louis Napoleon.
This group was an assortment of political conservatives, timid Orleanist liberals, and functionalist and organicist Saint-Simonians.
O'Brien deftly traces the painter's emergence as yet another talented pupil of Jacques-Louis David in the mid 1790s and early adventures as a kind of artistic journeyman in Italy, his rise to preeminence as artistic propagandist-in-chief to Napoleon, and his tragic demise under the Bourbon and Orleanist regimes.