Orléanists

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Orléanists

 

a monarchist group in France; at the time of the Restoration, supporters of the claims of Louis Philippe of Orléans to the throne: during the Revolution of 1830 they succeeded in having him proclaimed king.

Representing the interests of the financial aristocracy, the Orléanists were the ruling group in France during the July Monarchy (1830–48). In the Second Republic (1848–52), together with the Legitimists, supporters of the Bourbon dynasty, they constituted the reactionary “party of order,” whose policy helped establish the Second Empire. Later, sharing the views of the Versaillais, the Orléanists took part in suppressing the Paris Commune of 1871. In the 1870’s they helped prepare the abortive monarchist coup headed by M. E. P. MacMahon. After participating in the Boulangist movement of the end of the 1880’s, they left the political scene.

References in periodicals archive ?
In his description of Orleanist foreign policy, Guizot decried the expansionism of both Louis XIV and Napoleon and contended that respect for "the public law of Europe" was for "every well-regulated government not only an imperative duty, but a necessary precaution.
Terme, the city's Orleanist mayor, rewarded Monfalcon with the position of librarian of the smaller of the city's two libraries, the Library of the Palais des Arts.
The terms 'movement' and 'resistance' designated the more progressive and conservative factions among the Orleanists who had come to power in 1830.
Another with dual interests was Jean Fulchiron, a wealthy retired Lyons negotiant and prominent Orleanist, who was a member not only of the general council of commerce and manufacture but also of the Saint-Denis committee of primary instruction.
She also believed, despite the opposition of "Legitimists, Orleanists, & English" (p.
30) The Orleanists were a French political faction that took its name from the Orleans branch of the House of Bourbon.
These voices became ever more insistent, leading Jeanne, at 16, to feel compelled to travel to Chinon, to the court of Charles de Ponthieu, whom the Orleanists believed to be the Dauphin, or rightful claimant to the French crown.
Rather than joining Louis XVIII in exile in Ghent, Talleyrand put out feelers to the Orleanists, who he thought might emerge as a credible future monarchy among the Allies.
While clericalists and monarchists were ascendant in the early days of the Third Republic--hence the building of Sacre Coeur--the rival claims of the Bonapartists, Orleanists, and Legitimists ensured that the republic survived.