Ornan


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Ornan

(ôr`năn), same as AraunahAraunah
, in the Bible, Jebusite who sold his threshing floor to David so that an altar might be erected there. This site, on Mt. Moriah, was afterward used for the Temple. An alternate form is Ornan.
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In his introduction to these chapters, the Chronicler adds a clear description of the Temple's location, absent from the book of Kings: "Then Solomon began to build the House of the Lord in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where [the Lord] had appeared to his father David, at the place which David had designated, at the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite" (2 Chronicles 3:1).
officials sought access to naval and air bases throughout the Middle East and the Indian Ocean, including Egypt, Kenya, Ornan and Diego Garcia.
Hamori, "When Gods Were Men": The Embodied God in Biblical and Near Eastern Literature, BZAW, 384 (Berlin and New York, 2008); Tallay Ornan.
While the principal focus of many of the articles (Millard, Herrmann, Winter, Wicke, Uehlinger, and Rehm) is on locating the sources of production for the ivory carvings excavated from elite contexts of the first millennium at Nimrud and Samaria, objects created in other media, such as seals, metal, wood, and stone, also receive comparative attention (Mazzoni, Gubel, Ornan, Cechini, Faegersten, Matthaus, and Hoffman), as do those from earlier periods (Mazzoni, Cecchini, Faegersten, Matthaus, Hoffman).
New opportunities for studying the nature of the contact with the eastern Mediterranean have arisen from the discovery of a monumental stela in 1997 dating to the eighth century BC at the excavations of Beth-Saida, on the north-east coast of the Sea of Galilee (Israel) (Barnett & Keel 1998; Arav & Freund 1998; Ornan 2001) (cf.
Hauptmann (Heidelberg: Heidelberger Orientverlag, 1997), 227-34; and Tallay Ornan, "The Queen in Public: Royal Women in Neo-Assyrian Art," in Sex and Gender in the Ancient Near East: Proceedings of the 47th Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, Helsinki, July 2-6, 2001, ed.
The second section is entitled "Temple, Cult and Iconography," and includes papers by Avraham Biran on Dan, Ze'ev Herzog on Arad, Raz Kletter on pillar-based figurines, Kay Prag on figurines from Jerusalem, Tallay Ornan on the depiction of Ishtar in Iron Age Israel, and Norma Franklin on descriptions and depictions of the southern Levant in Sargon II's palace at Khorsabad.