Oroonoko


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Oroonoko

the noble savage enslaved; rebels against captors. [Br. Lit.: Oroonoko]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Which English novelist and playwright wrote Oroonoko? A Benjamin Zephaniah B Ben Aprahah C Aphra Behn D Behn Oronoko 12.
Oroonoko is the unabridged audiobook rendition of a groundbreaking novel, originally published in 1688, by one of the first female professional writers of England.
A similar set-up occurs in Behn's novel Oroonoko when the African prince arrives in Surinam and is presented to the Europeans and the other slaves.
It's somewhat padded: e.g., the plot summary of Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko (she visited the colony and was possibly a Royalist spy).
7) to this subject is also unfounded; despite her analysis of Aphra Behn's Oroonoko in her discussion of race, Barber rarely strays from historical analysis.
In my case studies, I will substantiate this claim by examining the conspicuous use of enumerations in two works that are often regarded as milestones in the early history of the English realist novel, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe.
For example, Pearl reads Aphra Behn's Oroonoko as utopian by attending to the moments in which it gestures beyond its own corrupt and narrow settings and imagines brighter possibilities.
(8.) Doyle points to the swoon as "a tableau-moment in narrative after narrative, from Behn's Oroonoko (1688) to Richardson's Clarissa (1748) to Pauline Hopkins's Of One Blood (1903): a character faints or momentarily collapses in the wake of violation by a terrorizing or tyrannizing force, whether seducer, slaver, or swelling sea storm.
Richards, Cynthia and Mary Ann O'Donnell, eds, Approaches to Teaching Behn's 'Oroonoko' (Approaches to Teaching World Literature), New York, Modern Languages Association of America, 2014; paperback; pp.
Aphra Behn's Oroonoko or The Royal Slave: A True History is late seventeenth century fictional work considered to be one of the earliest English novels.