Orthox

Orthox

[′ȯr‚thäks]
(geology)
A suborder of the soil order Oxisol that is moderate to low in organic matter, well drained, and moist all or nearly all year; believed to be extensive at low altitudes in the heart of the humid tropics.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the spinoff firms, Orthox, has used Spidrex as the basis for a more malleable material that can be shaped into knee cartilage and simultaneously serve as a biocompatible scaffold to encourage new cell growth.
Orthox has developed two different FibroFix implants.
It does the job of shock absorbing and force displacement," Orthox CEO and Chief Scientist Dr.
Companies Mentioned in this Report: aap Implantate AG, Biofix Medical Technologies, Bone-Rad Therapeutics, Inc., Exactech, Inc., Graftys SAS, Meta Biomed Co., Ltd., Onbone Oy, Orthox Ltd., Osseon Therapeutics, Inc., Ozics AG, Queen's University Belfast, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, Synthes, Inc., Teknimed S.A., University of Limerick, Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc.
Companies Mentioned in this Report: aap Implantate AG, Bone Solutions, Inc., Bone-Rad Therapeutics, Inc., Exactech, Inc., Graftys SAS, Medical Compression Systems (DBN) Ltd., Meta Biomed Co., Ltd., Onbone Oy, Orthox Ltd., Osseon Therapeutics, Inc., Ozics AG, Queen's University Belfast, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, Stryker Corporation, Synthes, Inc., Teknimed S.A., University of Limerick, Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc.
In the UK, a company called Orthox is using a similar rapid prototyping approach to create artificial cartilage implants that can replace the meniscus of the knee.
Six years later Orthox was formed to develop orthopaedic devices from the silk protein.
The substance was developed by a company named ORTHOX to develop the concept.