Osteomalacia


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Related to Osteomalacia: Paget's disease

osteomalacia

[¦äs·tē·ō·mə′lā·shə]
(medicine)
Failure of bone to ossify due to a reduced amount of available calcium. Also known as adult rickets.

Osteomalacia

 

a bone disease that is manifested by softening and deformity of bone as a result of disturbances in mineral metabolism; usually, the depletion of calcium salts, phosphoric acid, and vitamin D is the cause. Osteomalacia generally occurs in women, especially during pregnancy, in which case the pelvic bones and adjacent portions of the skeleton are particularly affected. Recovery occurs in the postpartum period. Bones may remain permanently deformed after osteomalacia as a result of calcification.

REFERENCE

“Osteomaliatsiia.” In Bol’shaia meditsinskaia entsiklopediia, 2nd ed., vol. 22, Moscow, 1961.
In animals. Osteomalacia in animals is manifested clinically by a decreased and unusual appetite, during which the animal exhibits pica and eats inedible objects. Other symptoms are emaciation and lowered productivity, lameness, loose teeth, sluggishness, curvature or sagging of the spinal column, and bone fractures. The diagnosis is based on analysis of the mineral and vitamin D content of feed; the calcium, phosphorus, and phosphatase content of blood; and roentgenograms of the tail vertebrae. Osteomalacia in animals is prevented by exercise, by regular checks of the feed and inclusion of optimum quantities of minerals and vitamins, and by ultraviolet irradiation while the animals are in their stalls.

REFERENCE

Vnutrennie nezaraznye bolezni zhivotnykh. Edited by A. M. Kolesov. Leningrad, 1972.
References in periodicals archive ?
A potential risk for osteomalacia due to sociocultural lifestyle in Turkish women.
Over time, untreated, this can lead to osteomalacia, a disorder characterized by decreased mineralization of osteoid.
Unexplained musculoskeletal pain in people of South Asian ethnic group referred to a rheumatology clinic - relationship to biochemical osteomalacia, persistence over time and response to treatment with calcium and vitamin D.
It is well known that in adults prolonged and severe vitamin D deficiency (<12.5 nmol/L) can cause osteomalacia, a musculoskeletal disorder that is associated with diffuse joint and bone pain, muscle weakness, difficulty in walking, bone demineralization, and increased fracture risk.
In computed tomography (CT) imaging of right knee, trabecular bone structure in the central part of the proximal tibia apparently was resorbed, which indicated osteomalacia, and medial cortex of the tibia was partly irregular (Figure 2(a)).
An iliac crest bone biopsy with trichrome staining (Figure 2) and tetracycline labeling (Figure 3) revealed marked osteomalacia and a severe mineralization defect.
Individuals with symptomatic osteomalacia or rickets have serum vitamin D concentrations of less than 10 ng/mL, reflecting profound vitamin D deficiency.
Glomangiopericytoma causing oncogenic osteomalacia. A case report with immunohistochemical analysis.
Case reports portray a connection between hypovitaminosis D prompted osteomalacia and a proximal myopathy that could be turned around with vitamin D supplementation [1114].
A lack of the essential nutrient can cause rickets in children and in adults can lead to osteomalacia, causing the person's bones to become weak and painful, and hampering mobility.
Among adults, it can also lead to bone pain and tenderness as a result of a condition called osteomalacia.
Hypocalcemia (low calcium in the blood) can be observed in cases of osteomalacia, hypomagnesemia, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, steatorrhea, pregnancy and lactation, nephrosis, nephritis, and hepatocellular or renal parenchymal cell disease.