Othniel Charles Marsh


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Marsh, Othniel Charles

 

Born Oct. 29, 1831, in Lockport, N.Y.; died Mar. 18, 1899, in New Haven, Conn. American paleontologist.

Marsh graduated from Yale University and did graduate work in Berlin, Breslau (now Wroclaw), and Heidelberg. From 1866 he was a professor at Yale University and director of the geology and paleontology departments of the Peabody Museum, which was subsequently made part of Yale University. He collected and described rare Mesozoic fossil mammals (the genera Dryolestes and Priacodon), as well as pterodactyls, Ichthyornis and Hesperornis, mesosaurs, dinosaurs, and Dinocerata. He constructed a genealogical tree of the horse based on American materials. Marsh was the first to investigate the brain size of fossil mammals. He also created a stratigraphic scale for the American continental series of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

WORKS

Odontornithes…. Washington, 1880.
Dinocerata. … Washington, 1885.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book also includes information about American fossil hunters Othniel Charles Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope, whose rivalry helped them discover more than one hundred forty-two dinosaur species, even while their "bone wars" bankrupted them.
Hayden still sent fossils to Philadelphia, including some to an ambitious young zoologist, Edward Drinker Cope, but he also began distributing fossils to Professor Othniel Charles Marsh at Yale University.
Two of paleontology's founding fathers, Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh, are among the most notorious when it comes to one-upmanship.