Ottawa sand

Ottawa sand

Naturally rounded grains of nearly pure quartz, produced by processing silica sand obtained from deposits near Ottawa, Ill.; used in mortar test specimens in testing hydraulic cement. Also see standard sand, graded standard sand.
References in periodicals archive ?
This research investigates the temporary reinforced effect of iron-powdered Ottawa sand 20-30 under controllable magnitudes of electromagnetic fields.
The study is undertaken on reconstituted specimens of Ottawa sand 20-30 with various amounts of iron powder.
In order to find the specifications mentioned above, the maximum and minimum void ratios of Ottawa sand are determined according to the methods in [23, 24], which are 0.478 and 0.652, respectively.
The preliminary trial with Ottawa sand at 80% relative density using 3 layers yielded a poor distribution of specimens, so to produce more uniform specimens, the number of layers is increased to 5.
The specimens consisting of iron powder and Ottawa sand under the magnetic fields yield similar curves, all of which are slightly above the curve from the clean sand.
Georgiannou and Konstadinou [16] investigated the response of Ottawa sand to cyclic torsional loading under different densities and proposed that the samples showed initial liquefaction at a loose state and high pore-water pressure ratio (>70%) at high densities under isotropic consolidation.
Konstadinou, "Effects of density on cyclic behaviour of anisotropically consolidated Ottawa sand under undrained torsional loading," Geotechnique, vol.
Figure 6 shows a typical set of results from this research for a CIU cyclic triaxial tests data regarding on an Ottawa sand sample; this figure shows three plots representing deviator stress, excess pore pressure, and axial strain measurement as a function of number of load cycles.
It may thus be affirmed that based on the important differences observed in terms of cyclic triaxial testing, between the Cabo Rojo calcareous sands and the quartzitic terrigenous Ottawa sands, conventional empirical in-situ based liquefaction methods (e.g.
When Pat Stogran drew a proverbial line in the Ottawa sand last year, he brought with him a pamphlet issued some years ago by the Canadian Alliance party.
These data indicate good agreement between our experimental results for Hostun sand and results for the other sands, especially Ottawa sand (Sherif et al., 1997) and Tongjiazhi sand (Xia and Hu, 1991).
(4), have concluded that the addition of glass fibers increased the strength (made with polyester resin and Ottawa sand with uniform size aggregates) in compression, flexure, and splitting tension.

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