Otto I


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Otto I

, Holy Roman emperor
Otto I or Otto the Great, 912–73, Holy Roman emperor (962–73) and German king (936–73), son and successor of Henry I of Germany. He is often regarded as the founder of the Holy Roman Empire. Boldly developing the policies that his father had begun, Otto brought the Middle Kingdom of the Carolingian Lothair I (see Verdun, Treaty of), including Italy, Burgundy, and Lotharingia, under German influence and broke the independence of the duchies. The rebellions of Otto's brother, Henry, and of Duke Eberhard of Franconia were ended by the battle of Andernach (939) and Henry's submission (941). King Louis IV of France, hoping to gain Lotharingia, had assisted the rebels, and Otto campaigned against him (940) with Hugh the Great; in 942, however, Otto and Louis reached an agreement, and Otto helped Louis to defeat Hugh (950). In 951, Otto invaded Italy, taking advantage of an appeal from the widowed Italian queen, Adelaide, who was about to be forced into a marriage with the son of Berengar II. Defeating Berengar, Otto assumed the title king of the Lombards, married Adelaide, and returned to Germany, where Berengar eventually paid him homage. In Germany another revolt was brewing. Rivalry and jealousy among the dukes, particularly against Otto's brother, Henry, whom he had made duke of Bavaria in 947, resulted in a rebellion in 953 led by Conrad the Red and Otto's son Duke Ludolf of Swabia. New attacks by the Magyars ended the rebellion and forced the dukes to form a united front against the invaders, who were defeated (955) in the Lechfeld. Otto had already begun to counter the ducal power by creating the “Ottonian system,” entailing close alliance between the crown and the higher prelates. An important exponent of the alliance was his brother and chief adviser, St. Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, whom Otto made duke of Lotharingia. Meanwhile, in Italy, Berengar II resumed his aggression. Pope John XII appealed to Otto, who entered Rome and was crowned emperor early in 962, reviving the imperial title of the Carolingians and legitimizing the German kings' claim to the Middle Kingdom; Otto thus linked the destinies of Italy and Germany. John soon found the emperor too powerful and, while Otto was campaigning against Berengar, secretly negotiated with Otto's enemies. Otto hastened back to Rome (963), deposed John, and installed a new pope, Leo VIII. The Romans, seeing all independence lost, rose in 964 and restored John, but John died the same year and Otto reinstated Leo. Otto's campaign (966–72) to gain control over S Italy was unsuccessful, but a minor diplomatic triumph was scored in 972 when Emperor John I of Byzantium gave a Greek princess in marriage to Otto's son and successor, Otto II.

Otto I

, king of Bavaria
Otto I, 1848–1916, king of Bavaria (1886–1913). Although incurably insane after 1872, he succeeded his brother King Louis II under the regency of his uncle Luitpold (1886–1912) and Luitpold's son Louis (1912–13). In 1913, Otto was deposed by an act of parliament, and the regent became king as Louis III.

Otto I

, king of Greece
Otto I, 1815–67, first king of the Hellenes (1833–62). The second son of King Louis I of Bavaria, he was chosen (1832) by a conference of European powers at London to rule newly independent Greece. He ascended the throne under a highly unpopular regency of Bavarians. A military coup (1843) forced a constitution on the king. His authority was further weakened when Greece sought to attack Turkey in 1854 after the outbreak of the Crimean War; France and Britain as a result occupied the port of Piraeus (Piraiévs). The king's attempts to discard the constitution led to another military revolt (1862) and to his deposition. In 1863 the Greeks chose a Danish prince to become their king as George I.
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Otto I

, Otho I
called the Great. 912--73 ad, king of Germany (936--73); Holy Roman Emperor (962--73)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Why Morrall, who was a political scientist, seized on Otto is not clear, but he caught the fascination of the man and the difficulty historians have had in placing him.
Otto I's placement of his niece Gerberga in Gandersheim in 940 may initially have been intended to prevent his rebellious brother Henry from marrying his daughter to a rival aristocratic house.
a sweet girl, insulting though you may be; and I'm sure my little otto is convinced he loves you ...
"Otto is a gentle giant and everyone at the store loves him - I'm sure they'll be really pleased for him!" Otto took on his new role earlier this year after the store manager saw a photo of him and decided he would be a good mascot for the store.
Perhaps I am too hungry for what I sense Otto is capable of: a sustained and complex account of Brandt's photomontage work.
Otto is a horticulturist and fruit grower who lives in Michigan.
With further development and exploration drilling activities still yet to be completed in the current program, Otto is extremely pleased with the progress that has been made in such a short period of time to build a successful independent oil and gas business partnering with some of the best operators in the Gulf of Mexico oil and gas region.
"Otto is targeting suitably qualified partners to join the program," the company said, stressing further that "a number of parties have commenced due diligence reviews of the data room ahead of the formal launch of the farm-out campaign."
The Jewish child and his family are forced to wear a yellow star by the government; when they are taken away to a concentration camp, Otto is given to the German boy, until a bombing run rips Otto from the house.
Otto is opportunity rich with an exploration portfolio that includes additional discoveries that are under development, approximately 20 drillable prospects covered by new 3D seismic and well over 60 exploration leads which are being matured as follow-up potential.