Ouida


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Ouida

(wē`də), pseud. of

Louise de la Ramée

(də lä rəmā`), 1839–1908, English novelist. She was a prolific writer of flamboyant, romantic tales, the best of which are Under Two Flags (1867), Moths (1880), and In Maremma (1882). Her stories for children include Two Little Wooden Shoes (1874), Bimbi (1882), and the well-known Dog of Flanders (1872).
References in periodicals archive ?
Mantegazza, Ouida and Vernon Lee offer effective representative
A small stone reads: "Moritz, with respect, admiration and everlasting love, Ouida and Basil."
of Mississippi) provide a comprehensive study of the work of Ouida (pen name for Marie Louise Rame, 1839-1908), an exceedingly popular and prolific author of novels and essays in the 19th century, and almost unknown in literary studies today.
As noted, Ouida Campbell had perceived in Chapel Hill the writers' different perceptions of Bigger Thomas, so perhaps the writers' mutual appreciation of each other's talent only kept an inevitable storm from erupting while they enjoyed each other's company during their work together.
JAMAICA -- Anton Allison, Micheal Anderson, Rohan Anderson, Prince Benbow, Nadria Brown, Shirley Brown, Wayne Chambers, Keith Cohen, Kedon Davidson, Othnel Ferguson, Raymond Forrester, Glen Gassop, Christopher Gordon, Snowdem Grant, Dianne Green, Denzil Hammond, Newton Joseph, Gregg Major, Mandy McKenzie, Verman McKenzie, Clive Mohalland, Andel Moodie, Ouida Pennant, Clement Reid, Winston Reid, Joycelyn Roach-Spencer, Hopeton Rodney, Wayne Searchwell, Selvin Shaw, Onley Spencer, Peter Stephen, Sherwin Stephens, Sherene Stobbs, Adylne Thomas, Haughton Thompson, Alfred Whitfield, Aeon Whyte, Alecia Whyte, Anthony Williams, Pauline Williams
The chapter on Ouida reminds us of her enormous popularity in her own age and also affirms that her development of aestheticist themes and techniques influenced the better remembered male aesthetes of the succeeding generation.
Posterity, she claims, has not been kind to women like Ouida, Lucas Malet, Alice Meynell and Rosamund Marriott Watson, all of whom were considered in their day to be the equal of the male writers now more commonly associated with aestheticism.
Braddon and Ouida" instead insists that Lady Audley has such an attraction to her maid.[2]
Ouida (Marie Louise de la Ramee) is associated with this genre, as is Ellen Thornycroft Fowler and John Oliver Hobbes (Pearl Mary Theresa Richard Craigie).
Elinor Glyn's Three Weeks (1907), following upon the scarlet-ish heels of her The Visits of Elizabeth, described by Gertrude Atherton as 'very naughty and very clever [ldots] and giving startling side-lights on country-house life in England', simply delighted the naive majority, the more sophisticated, however, dismissing it as mere Ouida r[acute{e}]eachauf[acute{e}]e.
Braddon, Rhoda Broughton, and Ouida (Madame de la Ramee).
for the Deaf & Blind PO Box 698 Talladega, AL 35160 (205) 761-3200 (205) 761-3344 (fax) PART C: OUIDA HOLDER Early Intervention Program 2129 E.