Ouidah


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Ouidah

(wē`dä) or

Whydah

(hwī`də), town (1992 pop. 32,474), S Benin, a port on the Gulf of Guinea. It was the capital of a small state founded about the 16th cent. From the early 17th cent., Portuguese, French, and Dutch traders were intermittently active at Ouidah, whose name was derived by Europeans from a nearby Portuguese fort called São João Baptista de Ajudá (St. John of Adjuda). In the 18th and early 19th cent. Ouidah was an important export point for slaves. In the 1840s the French established a substantial trade with Ouidah, exchanging textiles, guns, and gunpowder for palm oil and ivory. The town was annexed by France in 1886. Ouiday is a center of the Vodoun (voodoo) religion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ambassador Akinboboye who has just inaugurated the Destination Ouidah, an intra- ECOWAS tourism traffic stimulator dovetailing in Ouidah, Republic of Benin was said to have brought the Sea bikes from his recent tourism business trip to Germany.
by Madnomad We also visited the town of Ouidah, from where thousands of slaves were transported to the New World, in order to work at the plantations of the landowners.
La RAC descubrio que en algunos lugares las conchas eran indispensables para comerciar, particularmente en Ouidah y en el estuario del Benin.
Launched in 1994 in Ouidah, Benin, on a proposal from Haiti, "the Slave Route project: Resistance, Liberty, Heritage" pursues the following objectives:
Major organization : THE TRAINING CENTRE FOR DEMINING SHARES AND REMEDIATION OF OUIDAH
Most recently, PAS collaborated with American activist Sarah Dupont, co-founder of the International Center for Arts and Music in Ouidah, an arts and music school for children in Benin.
La Conference nationale de 1990, quant a elle, semble avoir remis l'honneur tant les autorites politiques traditionnelles (royautes) que les autorites religieuses precoloniales avec la manifestation Ouidah 92.
Born in Benin's coastal town of Ouidah, Talon became one of Benin's most economically powerful figures, controlling the country's key cotton industry as well as the port in the nation's commercial capital Cotonou, according to AFP.
In this impressively researched and very readable study of the Western Slave Coast, Silke Strickrodt examines the history of the multi-ethnic communities that came into being in that area of the Atlantic coastline that lay between the more studied polities of Accra and Anlo to the west, and Ouidah to the east.
Most of Captain Phillips's victims had been loaded at Ouidah in modern-day Benin.
Arriving from African ports in Sao Tome, the Mina Coast, Luanda, Lagos and Ouidah, among others, imported oil was the preference among urban consumers from the early eighteenth century.