hair cell

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hair cell

[′her ‚sel]
(histology)
The basic sensory unit of the inner ear of vertebrates; a columnar, polarized structure with specialized cilia on the free surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
10,11] The contributions of hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia could influence outer hair cell damage or other cochlear pathologies such as stria vascularis or fibrocyte damage, as a result of metabolic alterations.
The main site of damage is the outer hair cells in the basal turn of the cochlea, where aminoglycosides are received from the lysosomes of the cells' cytoplasm, which leads to the local formation of toxic free radicals and finally to hair cell apoptosis.
Screening for outer hair cell dysfunction DPOAEs to identify early, potentially preclinical damage.
1) The damage in hearing are caused by the destruction of outer hair cells and neurons similar to cispalatin toxicity, noise induced hearing loss and perhaps the age-related hearing impairment.
Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are active cochlea biomechanisms, which are incidents that require energy, and are caused by outer hair cells and illustrate the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the cochlea.
Permanent threshold shifts are a result of the swelling and deforming of outer hair cells and alterations in endoplasmic reticulum.
153-158) Specifically, it has been shown that sulfhydryl compounds limit geatamicin-induced damage to outer hair cells in vitro and that in vivo gentamicin ototoxicity can be diminished with glutathione.
1] Since then, many investigations have shown that otoacoustic emissions are the result of the rapid contraction of the outer hair cells.
7) This ultra-high to low frequency gradient seems biologically explained by the finding that outer hair cells near the base of the cochlea are reported to be affected first by cisplatin, progressing to apical cells with increasing dose.
When the outer hair cells become nonfunctional, the result is a reduction in hearing sensitivity, typically in the high-frequency region.
This test checks the function of the tiny outer hair cells in the inner ear that are believed to be the most vulnerable to damage from prolonged noise exposure, and are crucial to normal hearing, the ability to hear soft (or low level sounds), and the ability to understand speech, especially in noisy environments.
Disabling the gene caused a loss of outer hair cells, a special sensory cell in the inner ear responsible for amplifying sound.