Outlawry


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Outlawry

See also Highwaymen, Thievery.
Bass, Sam
(1851–1878) train robber and all-around desperado. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 244]
Billy the Kid
(William H. Bonney, 1859–1881) infamous cold-blooded killer. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 30]
Bonnie and Clyde
(Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow) bank robbers and killers (1930s). [Am. Hist.: Worth, 35]
Cassidy, Butch, and the Sundance Kid
(Henry Brown) (fl. late 19th century) Western outlaws made famous by popular film. [Am. Hist. and Am. Cinema: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Halliwell, 116]
Dalton
gang bank robbers of late 1800s; killed in shootout (1892). [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 15–16]
Dillinger, John
(1902–1934) murderous gunslinging bank robber of 1930s. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 290]
Grettir
Viking adventurer, outlawed for his ruthless slayings. [Icelandic Lit.: Grettir the Strong in Magill I, 335]
Holliday, “Doc”
(fl. late 19th century) outlaw who helped Wyatt Earp fight the Clanton gang (1881). [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
James, Jesse
(1847–1882) romanticized train and bank robber. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 219]
Ringo, Johnny
(fl. late 19th century) notorious outlaw and gunfighter in the Southwest. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
Rob Roy
(Robert MacGregor, 1671–1734) Scottish Highland outlaw remembered in Sir Walter Scott’s novel Rob Roy (1818). [Scottish Hist.: EB, VIII: 619]
Robin Hood
(13th century) legendary outlaw of England who robbed the rich to help the poor. [Br. Hist.: EB, VIII: 615–616]
Turpin, Dick
(1706–1739) English outlaw who robbed travelers on the road from London to Oxford. [Br. Hist.: WB, 19: 425]
Villa, Pancho
(1878–1923) notorious Mexican bandit and revolutionary. [Mex. Hist.: EB, X: 435–436]
References in periodicals archive ?
Where once outlawry could be assured simply by adoption of lesbian sexuality and lifestyle it seems that the apparently greater social possibilities gained for lesbians by lesbian liberation have made things too easy," thus leading to the new "sexual outlaw" lesbians engaging in S/M.
Outside this, the outlawry of Fouke takes him away from his home into the forest, which is associated with themes and incidents from popular stories.
She sets out to make this argument in a series of chapters dealing with outlawry in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman England and in the reigns of Henry II, Richard I to early Henry III, Henry III (after 1223), and Edward I.
This reading partially explains why outlawry was seen as appropriate for Gamelyn to solve his feud with Johan, yet the conflict between folk law and crown law as central to The Tale of Gamelyn can be investigated more deeply by a closer scrutiny of the mechanisms of social control and self-help.
Outlawry Brings Targeted Killing in Line with Other Government
Upon judgment therefore of death, and not before, the attainder of a criminal commences: or upon such circumstances as are equivalent to judgment of death; as judgment of outlawry on a capital crime, pronounced for absconding or fleeing from justice, which tacitly confesses the guilt.
This chapter also articulates the gradual shift in the severity of penalties exacted for convictions of witchcraft; initially, punishment only involves minor forms of outlawry in cases of private practice, but after the thirteenth century, all pagan practices are outlawed and the sentence is death.
The ancient common law doctrine of attainder led to automatic extinction of various civil rights and capacities, such as the rights to inherit and to hold or deal with property, where the accused was sentenced to death or outlawry having been convicted of treason or a felony.
37) He argues further that Rastas linked militancy to Black nationalism and rudies combined Black consciousness with social outlawry.
Army Field Manual 27-10, The Law of Land Warfare (1956), which has incorporated this prohibition, authoritatively links Hague Article 23(b) to assassination at Paragraph 31: "This article is construed as prohibiting assassination, proscription or outlawry of an enemy, or putting a price upon an enemy's head, as well as offering a reward for an enemy "dead or alive.
Lawyer Fein is not referring to a one time episode like Watergate but a recurrent, pattern of massive outlawry here and abroad stretching for years.
Malice in the proper sense is simply acting for a reason and purpose knowingly foreign to the administration, to which was added here the element of intentional punishment by what was virtually vocation outlawry.