override


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override

[′ō·və‚rīd]
(control systems)
To cancel the influence of an automatic control by means of a manual control.
References in periodicals archive ?
If there aren't enough votes to override, the vetoes are allowed to die.
Take, for instance, House Bill 3418, which unanimously passed the Senate and cleared the House with 88 votes, 17 more than necessary to override. The bill would allow local governments to use tax incentives to create urban agriculture zones.
Before the House of Representatives suspended its session last February, 89 lawmakers had agreed to support the veto override.
Even Republicans are acknowledging that more than six of the remaining 15 Democrats will support the president and prevent a veto override.
In 2008, the school administration believed we needed school bus fees because an override was defeated.
The high stakes politics surrounding veto override attempts offer an ideal opportunity to study the president's influence in Congress.
standard, an agency may override the stay "upon a written finding
If the seven makers are to install the override systems in some of the vehicles they have already sold, it would constitute modifications on a massive scale, thereby reducing their profitability, they said.
The brake override systems are being installed following two safety recalls involving around nine million vehicles globally.
Probably the most frequent and basic task that an operator performs on the BAS is to override an object's value, such as overriding a failed sensor's value until the sensor is replaced, or changing a system setpoint.
Unless the two parties can work out a deal to override the veto in a second House vote, the showdown between Kulongoski and the Legislature will break in the governor's favor.
In both judicial decisions and critical commentary on statutory interpretation, the possibility of congressional override is generally considered a significant balance to the countermajoritarian reality that courts, through statutory interpretation, make policy.