Stand

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stand

1. a stall, booth, or counter from which goods may be sold
2. an exhibition area in a trade fair
3. Cricket an extended period at the wicket by two batsmen
4. a growth of plants in a particular area, esp trees in a forest or a crop in a field
5. a stop made by a touring theatrical company, pop group, etc., to give a performance (esp in the phrase one-night stand)
6. (of a gun dog) the act of pointing at game

Stand

 

a section of forest, natural or artificial in origin, that includes trees, shrubs, and various forest plants. There are various types of stands, consisting of groups of trees and other forest components having features characteristic of the given section (origin, kinds of trees, form, density, age, forest type, quality).


Stand

 

an inclined support on which music is placed. Stands in front of musicians who play the same part in the orchestra, for example, the first violins, are designated by consecutive numbers (first stand, second stand, third stand, and so on). The concertmaster and his assistant sit behind the first stand.

stand

[stand]
(ecology)
A group of plants, distinguishable from adjacent vegetation, which is generally uniform in species composition, age, and condition.
(forestry)
The amount of standing timber per unit area; usually expressed in terms of volume.
(metallurgy)
A set of rolls used in a metal-rolling process.
(oceanography)
The interval at high or low water when there is no appreciable change in the height of the tide. Also known as tidal stand.
References in classic literature ?
It rests with heaven to determine whether he is to return, and take his revenge in his own house or no; I would, however, urge you to set about trying to get rid of these suitors at once.
This he learned from their own confession: for otherwise, there not being above two or three of that species born in an age, they were too few to form a general observation by.
What is to hinder your facili tating the post-office work, and obliging a lady, by adding the name of the post-town (if it happens to be left out), with your own hand?
Few fathers would have let me have my own way half so much.
But the company would not let him; they insisted that he should remain and defend his position; and I myself added my own humble request that he would not leave us.
His own stomach could bear nothing rich, and he could never believe other people to be different from himself.
I've seen the time when I wouldn't have left them stones lying out there," he said, and presently, "Why, God bless you, I've made my own boots before to-day.
She had fully expected--having reached the end of her terrible story--to find Emily at her feet, entreating her not to carry out her intention of leaving the cottage the next morning; and she had determined, after her sense of her own importance had been sufficiently flattered, to grant the prayer of the helpless young lady.
He now gave Mrs Deborah positive orders to take the child to her own bed, and to call up a maid-servant to provide it pap, and other things, against it waked.
She went to it; but the music on which her eye first rested was an opera, procured for her by Willoughby, containing some of their favourite duets, and bearing on its outward leaf her own name in his hand-writing.
He has no need of affectation--he is far too well satisfied with his own character; and his pride is too deep-seated to appear at all on the outside.
So still and subdued and yet somehow preluding was all the scene, and such an incantation of revery lurked in the air, that each silent sailor seemed resolved into his own invisible self.