Oxfordian

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Oxfordian

[äks′fȯr·dē·ən]
(geology)
A European stage of geologic time, in the Upper Jurassic (above Callovian, below Kimmeridgean). Also known as Divesian.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, many Oxfordians regard his original work as brilliant and correct, as does Harris, saying he has reason to believe it points to Dyer.
While Oxfordians have sometimes seized on Jonson's poem as evidence that Shakespeare of Stratford was regarded as a fraud by his contemporaries, Shakespeareans, by contrast, have had little to say about Jonson's Poet-Ape.
The debate between Shakespeare supporters, the Stratfordians, and the Oxford camp, the Oxfordians, rages to this day with the latter's views getting big screen exposure in Roland Emmerich's film.
"The Oxfordians, the Baconians, the Stratfordians, some people say it was a woman, some people say it was this collaboration--so I look forward to further investigation."
In England, the Oxfordians make a distinction between South Africans and other Africans.
The Oxfordians, for example, effortlessly slide over the Earl of Oxford's death in 1604, twelve years before Shakespeare's.
Unlike Marlovians and Oxfordians, who can claim that the extant writings of their candidate predate those written as Shakespeare, Tassinari doesn't have that luxury.
Hackett observes that movements of Baconians and Oxfordians continue to thrive, and she mentions the 'Declaration of Reasonable Doubt' initiated by Strahan, Rylance, and Jacobi [172].
The re-branding has caused dismay among some Oxfordians, who may have believed that their own little city was well enough known for its university to survive without pretending to be a London suburb.
There are by my count five Oxfordians who are members of SHAKSPER.
In short, according to Sogolo, as far back as the mid nineteenth century, Thomas Huxley and Herbert Spencer both English and probably Oxfordians played a spoiler role by enunciating a pecking order of worldwideness for the disciplines, resulting in the downgrading and relegation of the Artistic and Humanistic disciplines.
Its author does not take up contrary evidence to most of his assertions, and, like most Oxfordians, he cannot be taken seriously as a scholar.

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