Oxonian


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Oxonian

1. of or relating to Oxford or Oxford University
2. a member of Oxford University
3. an inhabitant or native of Oxford
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
15700, since it was copied by and belonged to the former Oxonian and cathedral canon, Thomas Cyrcetur.
Yet the Oxonians decide that the advantages of riding in the open air and not enclosing oneself in a stuffy atmosphere, along with the chance of an opportunity to actually drive the coach make change worthwhile.
and his Elegant Friend, Corinthian Tom, Accompanied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in their Rambles and Sprees through the Metropolis, published in 1821, gives us a vivid picture.
During his gallery talk, John's personality emerges, for fellow Oxonian Phil Mullen describes him in this way: "The famed author, now become also a painter, talked in his soft Old South voice with always a breath of humor in it and he stopped his own gallery talks at the end of 20 minutes.
This comes early in the second act, when the young Housman must admit, to himself and to his beloved friend, that his affection is not merely platonic but closer to the "beastliness" they'd joked about earlier when discussing a slightly senior Oxonian, Oscar Wilde.
All too often Aristotle has been treated by twentieth century philosophers as if he were, to borrow an Oxonian phrase, just "a fellow of another college." The reason for such an alienation is not a lack of any intuitive Einfuhlung or intellectual sympathy in the eighteenth-century sense.
Freeman, another Oxonian and ironically, a Home Ruler,
And then there is a general confusion (related perhaps to the mistake about Emmanuel College) about Oxonian nomenclature.
For some critics this discussion merely underscores the essentially dated, Victorian, and Oxonian character of his treatise.(48) However, even Newman's admirers tend to politely ignore the concerns raised in these discourses.
It is precisely this status-he both belongs to the Cumner Hill and resides outside it; he is both Oxonian and shepherd--that makes the Scholar-Gipsy such a mythic figure for the speaker, who now takes on a similarly mythic persona through the transformative powers of poetry.
The achievement would be even starker because as an Etonian Oxonian he epitomises the elitism that is perceived as a problem for the PM.
He insinuated, then, that Newman had formed his own imagined certitudes not among the realities of "the active life," but in some distant sphere of Oxonian abstraction.