Oxonian

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Related to Oxonians: Oxfordian

Oxonian

1. of or relating to Oxford or Oxford University
2. a member of Oxford University
3. an inhabitant or native of Oxford
References in periodicals archive ?
Other pieces within the miscellany reveal an interest in Oxford consonant with the author's claim of having been educated there: 'A Dialogue Betwixt a Gentleman and His OXFORD Laundress' (60-1); 'The Character of a Collector of St Johns Colledge Oxon (78-80); and the various elegies on Oxonians including the 'Clerke of Cairfaux' (93) and 'Mr Lightfoot, Cooke of Wad.
To my ear, Ruskin's next comments here comprise a Christian typological critique of another Oxonian, Walter Pater, who had previously held up for secular veneration La Gioconda.
One could not expect that intimate acquaintance with the city or its students and dons that one finds in, say, Waugh's Brideshead Revisited or Compton Mackenzie's Sinister Street, classic works from the pens of Oxonians.
It is true that he made an expedition bringing medical supplies to Budapest in the company of three other young Oxonians, but apart from that one fact, everything else is incorrect.
Pulcra sunt quae visa placent: Hopkins's "bye-ways beauty" is certainly, in Aquinas's phrase, "that which pleases when seen"--at least by him, and so much the better if it is also the peculiar pleasure of other eyes, if its epiphany is multiply replicated among Oxonians.
William Blackwood allowed Wilson and Lockhart, his sub-editors and classical Oxonians, to deride the formal education of Dugald Stewart's Edinburgh, but a half--frivolous monthly miscellany such as Blackwood's could not find a large reading-public by consistently promoting a return to Scoto-Latin culture.
But his grandfather, who died in 1922, had served many years on the university's board of trustees, and from the time he was a child Faulkner, like other Oxonians, came onto the university campus to watch Shakespeare performed in the grove, to witness Civil War re-enactments, to lurk in the background at fraternity parties, to attend athletic events, to take classes, and, without a doubt, to visit the library.
As Frederick's date of birth is known to the Oxonians, John Richards declares: 'Caesaris Augusti natus sub mense fuisti,/Augustus Caesar forte futurus eras' (Epithalamia, 1613: L 2/v).
Chatting as fellow Oxonians, she shared with me the two reasons she finds most people visit Oxford: William Faulkner and Ole Miss.
After Oxford, which he left without a degree, Waugh did what his generation of jobless or degree-less Oxonians did, taught at an obscure private school.
Even after Hopkins became a priest stationed in Oxford, though he avoided most Oxonians, he did, out of longstanding regard, seek Pater out We know that both, lovers of painting, went to a number of British art museums together.
Historically, Trifogli draws on earlier work in identifying certain manuscripts as the work of a group of Oxonians, writing between 1250 and 1270, only two of whom are known by name, William Clifford and Geoffrey Aspall.