Oxyria

Oxyria

 

a genus of plants of the Polygonaceae (buckwheat) family. They are perennial herbs with a creeping rhizome and radical kidney-shaped leaves on long petioles. The flowers are bisexual and in a panicle. The perianth is tetramerous; there are six stamens; the fruit is a pinnate nutlet. Two or three species are known in Eurasia and North America; they grow in the arctic zone and in the alpine belt of mountains, near brooks and springs, on shingle, and on rocky slopes. In the USSR mountain sorrel (O. digyna) grows in the tundra and mountains of Siberia and the Far East, while O. elatior grows in the Caucasus and Middle Asia. Oxyria leaves are acid to the taste and rich in vitamin C.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, despite Geum reptans and Oxyria digyna being dormant (Table 1), they were both short-term persistent corroborating the claim that some dormant seeds are also short-lived in soil.
The differential effects of environmental conditions on dormancy may also explain why Oxyria digyna has been classified both as dormant (Stocklin & Baumler, 1996; Schwienbacher et al.
Seeds of Oxyria digyna can germinate immediately after dispersal if the temperature is between 10 and 15[degrees]C, but some seeds can even germinate below 10[degrees]C, if the temperatures fluctuate between 13 and 2[degrees]C and have light for 12 h (Mooney & Billings, 1961).
Mondoni et ah (2012) showed that seeds of Oxyria digyna germinated at 2[degrees]C higher than the current alpine climate (12/12 h photoperiod) achieved higher germination, but that there is a tendency for the seeds to become autumn germinators because dormancy is lacking.
Alpicola, Geam reptans, Linaria alpina, Oxyria digyna, Saxifraga aizoides, S.
Genera with fin-winged fruits in at least some of their species include Calligonum, Fagopyrum, Fallopia, Neomillspaughia, Oxygonum, Oxyria, Parapteropyrum, Podopterus, Polygonella, Pteropyrum, Pteroxygonum, Rheum, and Rumex.
It is similar in morphology to fruits of extant Oxyria (Fig.
Positive versus negative interactions in a high alpine block field: Germination of Oxyria digyna seeds in a Ranunculus glacialis community.