Oyashio

Oyashio

[ō′yā·shē·ō]
(oceanography)
A cold current flowing from the Bering Sea southwest along the coast of Kamchatka, past the Kuril Islands, continuing close to the northeast coast of Japan, and reaching nearly 35°N.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first was made by the JS Uruga and JS Takashima on March 2, followed by the submarine Oyashio, JS Anake and JS Setogiri on April 3, JS Ise on April 26 and JS Yudachi and JS Yougiri on Aug.
In this study area, located between the subarctic and subtropical domains of the North Pacific, the confluence of the warm Kuroshio Current and the cold Oyashio Current forms the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (Roden, 1991), also called the subarctic-subtropical transition zone.
Japanese submarine Oyashio and destroyers JS Ariake and JS Setogiri docked in the Subic port Sunday to participate as observers in this year's Balikatan - an annual bilateral training exercise between the Philippines and the United States.
The heat content is indicative of the wind-driven, upper-ocean circulation with subtropical and subpolar gyres and the Kuroshio/ Oyashio Extension current along the tight gradient between them.
This estuary is semiclosed and is connected to Akkeshi Bay (open to the Pacific Ocean-controlled cold Oyashio Current) via a narrow channel (width, 500 m).
In particular, the waters off Fukushima are squeezed between the Kuroshio, which flows northeastward near Chiba Prefecture and then turns eastward, and the colder and fresher Oyashio Current, which flows south from the Arctic Ocean.
eastern North Pacific, and the Oyashio Current, running southward from
A: Roughly speaking, the sub-arctic Oyashio current, which flows southward along the Pacific coasts of Hokkaido and the Tohoku region, and the Kuroshio current, which flows northward from the Kyushu and Shikoku regions, collide off Choshi, Chiba Prefecture during this period of the season.
The Oyashio class of eleven submarines, commissioned between 1998 and 2008, is the major class in service.
The 59 advanced to within 100 yards of the Oyashio and raked the ship's superstructure and gun mounts, killing the soldiers on deck.
Navigational logs kept on board the MSDF's 2,750-ton Oyashio have shown that the vessel, moving in a southwesterly direction, veered to the right when it was supposed to go straight, the officials said.
This fact suggests that this cold water was not an upwelling of bottom water but due to southern movement of Oyashio.